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dc.contributor.authorJung, Kwansue.
dc.creatorJung, Kwansue.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-31T17:59:17Z
dc.date.available2011-10-31T17:59:17Z
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/186123
dc.description.abstractA procedure for computing total suspended sediment load using a single point-integrated sample is presented. A power velocity distribution and Laursen's concentration distribution equation (1980) are used: U/U = (x + 1) (y/D)ˣ and C/Cₐ = (a/y)ᶻ where x = 1/4 to 1/7 and z = w/(βκ√(τ₀/ρ); other symbols are as commonly used. The procedure was tested with USGS (1971) field data from the Rio Grande. Using nominal values of β, κ, and w results in estimates of total suspended concentration that agree sufficiently well with depth-integrated measurements corrected for unmeasured load; even better agreement was obtained when site-specific data are used to define the x and z exponents. The difference between total suspended load computed using this procedure (and a single measurement) and conventional computations based on depth-integrated measurements is well within sampling error. For fine sediment (small z value) errors in measurements do not have a large effect on the integrated sediment load. For coarse sediment, however, placement of the sampler, elevation of the bed, and other values must be known with more precision. The typical scatter in suspended sediment load versus discharge plots can be explained by considering possible changes in bed material over time. Laursen's (1958) relationship for total sediment load can be used to evaluate such changes and to calculate bed load. There are major advantages in estimating total suspended load using one time-integrated suspended-sediment point sample. Less field time is required; sampling costs are greatly reduced; and sampling can be more frequent and better timed to measure the changing sediment load. Automatic sampling procedures are more feasible.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectDissertations, Academic.en_US
dc.subjectCivil engineering.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology.en_US
dc.titleA sediment discharge computation procedure based on a time-integrated point sample.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.contributor.chairLaursen, Emmett M.en_US
dc.contributor.chairPeterson, Margaret S.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc714901547en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberContractor, Dinshaw N.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberInce, Simonen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberClark, Robert A.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9322626en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCivil Engineering and Engineering Mechanicsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
dc.description.noteThis item was digitized from a paper original and/or a microfilm copy. If you need higher-resolution images for any content in this item, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
dc.description.admin-noteOriginal file replaced with corrected file September 2023.
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-23T10:08:44Z
html.description.abstractA procedure for computing total suspended sediment load using a single point-integrated sample is presented. A power velocity distribution and Laursen's concentration distribution equation (1980) are used: U/U = (x + 1) (y/D)ˣ and C/Cₐ = (a/y)ᶻ where x = 1/4 to 1/7 and z = w/(βκ√(τ₀/ρ); other symbols are as commonly used. The procedure was tested with USGS (1971) field data from the Rio Grande. Using nominal values of β, κ, and w results in estimates of total suspended concentration that agree sufficiently well with depth-integrated measurements corrected for unmeasured load; even better agreement was obtained when site-specific data are used to define the x and z exponents. The difference between total suspended load computed using this procedure (and a single measurement) and conventional computations based on depth-integrated measurements is well within sampling error. For fine sediment (small z value) errors in measurements do not have a large effect on the integrated sediment load. For coarse sediment, however, placement of the sampler, elevation of the bed, and other values must be known with more precision. The typical scatter in suspended sediment load versus discharge plots can be explained by considering possible changes in bed material over time. Laursen's (1958) relationship for total sediment load can be used to evaluate such changes and to calculate bed load. There are major advantages in estimating total suspended load using one time-integrated suspended-sediment point sample. Less field time is required; sampling costs are greatly reduced; and sampling can be more frequent and better timed to measure the changing sediment load. Automatic sampling procedures are more feasible.


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