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dc.contributor.authorFreese, John Richard.
dc.creatorFreese, John Richard.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-31T18:02:18Z
dc.date.available2011-10-31T18:02:18Z
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/186216
dc.description.abstractThe role of nonpublic schools within American society has often been debated and challenged, yet for over three hundred and fifty years such schools have existed within what is now the United States. A significant portion of these nonpublic schools have been parochial schools operated by Lutheran denominations. Lutheran parochial schools were established by most European Lutheran immigrant groups to the United States, but the majority were established by German immigrants. German Lutheran immigrants to the United States initially established and maintained parochial schools to perpetuate their language, their culture, and their doctrinal standards. During World War I, extraordinary pressures from society and from the state came to bear on German Lutheran parochial schools. This study examined the public opinions and state policies within Nebraska from 1915-1925, as applied to German Lutheran parochial schools. The symbolic approach toward organizations was the analytical frame used for this study.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectChurch schools -- Nebraska -- History.en_US
dc.subjectLutherans -- Education -- Nebraska -- History.en_US
dc.subjectGerman Americans -- Education -- Nebraska -- History.en_US
dc.subjectChurch schools -- Nebraska -- Public opinion -- History.en_US
dc.titleA symbolic analysis of state educational policy and reaction in a selected state, 1915-1925.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.contributor.chairNelson, Lawrence O.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc703263315en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMedina, Marcello, Jr.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberConley, Sharonen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9322726en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Administration and Higher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.nameEd.D.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-23T21:34:46Z
html.description.abstractThe role of nonpublic schools within American society has often been debated and challenged, yet for over three hundred and fifty years such schools have existed within what is now the United States. A significant portion of these nonpublic schools have been parochial schools operated by Lutheran denominations. Lutheran parochial schools were established by most European Lutheran immigrant groups to the United States, but the majority were established by German immigrants. German Lutheran immigrants to the United States initially established and maintained parochial schools to perpetuate their language, their culture, and their doctrinal standards. During World War I, extraordinary pressures from society and from the state came to bear on German Lutheran parochial schools. This study examined the public opinions and state policies within Nebraska from 1915-1925, as applied to German Lutheran parochial schools. The symbolic approach toward organizations was the analytical frame used for this study.


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