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dc.contributor.authorMorehouse, Barbara Jo.
dc.creatorMorehouse, Barbara Jo.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-31T18:03:59Z
dc.date.available2011-10-31T18:03:59Z
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/186272
dc.description.abstractThe management of natural resources entails the social construction of geographical space. Within the EuroAmerican tradition, these constructions have involved not only the definition of spaces but also the delineation of boundaries. The process of spatial construction and boundary delineation, when it includes contests among competing interests, or when it entails situations of dominance and resistance, engenders relations of power. The power relations most often take place within the realm of social, political, and economic discourse and practice. The outcomes of these power relations are legally and cartographically defined spaces which, in turn, become inputs to subsequent relations of power. Discourse analysis, power analysis, structuration theory, and postmodernist concepts provide a framework within which such processes may be productively analyzed. These approaches, as well as an innovative approach to examining functionalities of boundaries in the construction of space, have been employed to analyze and explain the partitioning and repartitioning of the spaces of Grand Canyon, an area not only of outstanding beauty, but also one where contests over geographical space and its resources have a long and well-documented history. The approach employed in this study is applicable to a broad range of inquiries regarding the social construction of space, particularly when such construction occurs within the context of natural resource management.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectNatural resources -- United States -- Management.en_US
dc.titlePower relationships in the spatial partitioning and natural resource management of the Grand Canyon.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.contributor.chairWaterstone, Marvinen_US
dc.identifier.oclc702371306en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKirby, Andrewen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMarston, Sallieen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberZube, Ervinen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberShaw, Williamen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9328575en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGeography and Regional Developmenten_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-19T09:31:09Z
html.description.abstractThe management of natural resources entails the social construction of geographical space. Within the EuroAmerican tradition, these constructions have involved not only the definition of spaces but also the delineation of boundaries. The process of spatial construction and boundary delineation, when it includes contests among competing interests, or when it entails situations of dominance and resistance, engenders relations of power. The power relations most often take place within the realm of social, political, and economic discourse and practice. The outcomes of these power relations are legally and cartographically defined spaces which, in turn, become inputs to subsequent relations of power. Discourse analysis, power analysis, structuration theory, and postmodernist concepts provide a framework within which such processes may be productively analyzed. These approaches, as well as an innovative approach to examining functionalities of boundaries in the construction of space, have been employed to analyze and explain the partitioning and repartitioning of the spaces of Grand Canyon, an area not only of outstanding beauty, but also one where contests over geographical space and its resources have a long and well-documented history. The approach employed in this study is applicable to a broad range of inquiries regarding the social construction of space, particularly when such construction occurs within the context of natural resource management.


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