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dc.contributor.authorBadawi, Samir Farag.
dc.creatorBadawi, Samir Farag.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-31T18:06:48Z
dc.date.available2011-10-31T18:06:48Z
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/186361
dc.description.abstractThis study examined the question of whether there was a difference in the general school experiences of children who move to a new country with an entirely different culture and language and children who immigrate to a country with a language and culture that is similar to their native culture. It was noted that existing literature had stated that immigrant children's school experiences can be affected by any attitudes about the country of immigration and its people which they pick up from their parents as well as from the degree of parents' willingness to interact with the new culture. Based on these postulates, it was predicted that being in a culture different from one's own makes for far more problems in school than merely language or academic difficulties. Subjects in the study consisted of Arab families whose children were attending school in either the United States of America or the United Arab Emirate and who had one or more children in the fourth or fifth grades. All data were collected using researcher-designed questionnaires given to parents, children, and their teachers. Four research questions were formulated which examined the general school experiences of Arabic school children who immigrated to the United Arab Emirate or to the United States. The findings reveal that U.A.E. parents held more positive views of their children's school experiences than did U.S.A. parents. However, children in both U.A.E. and U.S.A. show positive views in terms of general school experiences. Teachers' perceptions of children's school adjustment and level of school success did not differ in association with cultural differences. Both descriptive (computation of frequencies and percentages) and inferential (t-tests, chi square) analyses were conducted. Findings revealed several differences in association with differences in the similarity/dissimilarity of the country of immigration to the country of birth for parents, children, and teacher groups. The study recommended that objective measures, more social variables, gender differences, time period of immigration, different level of schooling, language proficiency and method of teaching be investigated in the future.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectArab students -- United States.en_US
dc.subjectArab students -- United Arab Emirates.en_US
dc.titleThe educational differences between Arab students who immigrated to the U.S.A. and Arab students who immigrated to the United Arab Emirates.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.contributor.chairRuiz, Richarden_US
dc.identifier.oclc700942495en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMoll, Luis C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMcCarty, Teresaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9408393en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineLanguage, Reading and Cultureen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.nameEd.D.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-13T09:17:04Z
html.description.abstractThis study examined the question of whether there was a difference in the general school experiences of children who move to a new country with an entirely different culture and language and children who immigrate to a country with a language and culture that is similar to their native culture. It was noted that existing literature had stated that immigrant children's school experiences can be affected by any attitudes about the country of immigration and its people which they pick up from their parents as well as from the degree of parents' willingness to interact with the new culture. Based on these postulates, it was predicted that being in a culture different from one's own makes for far more problems in school than merely language or academic difficulties. Subjects in the study consisted of Arab families whose children were attending school in either the United States of America or the United Arab Emirate and who had one or more children in the fourth or fifth grades. All data were collected using researcher-designed questionnaires given to parents, children, and their teachers. Four research questions were formulated which examined the general school experiences of Arabic school children who immigrated to the United Arab Emirate or to the United States. The findings reveal that U.A.E. parents held more positive views of their children's school experiences than did U.S.A. parents. However, children in both U.A.E. and U.S.A. show positive views in terms of general school experiences. Teachers' perceptions of children's school adjustment and level of school success did not differ in association with cultural differences. Both descriptive (computation of frequencies and percentages) and inferential (t-tests, chi square) analyses were conducted. Findings revealed several differences in association with differences in the similarity/dissimilarity of the country of immigration to the country of birth for parents, children, and teacher groups. The study recommended that objective measures, more social variables, gender differences, time period of immigration, different level of schooling, language proficiency and method of teaching be investigated in the future.


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