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dc.contributor.authorNewman, Jane Ann.
dc.creatorNewman, Jane Ann.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-31T18:11:15Z
dc.date.available2011-10-31T18:11:15Z
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/186497
dc.description.abstractAs an individual moves into the later years of life, he or she is prone to loss of interpersonal skills and support from others. Affective empathy is considered to be a skill which assists individuals in building interpersonal relationships and thereby increasing support from others. Zazen (Zen) meditation is proposed to increase affective empathic responses. The current study involved 19 senior citizens, ages 60-77 (six males and 13 females) randomly assigned to either a control group or an experimental group. The experimental group received zazen (Zen) meditation training and the control group received an irrelevant activity (mathematical exercises). Each group received the activity for five days, three hours per day. Affective empathy was measured pretest and posttest. The pretest was the Emotional Empathic Tendency Scale (Mehrabian & Epstein, 1972) and posttest was the Empathic Concern subscale of the Interpersonal Reactivity Index (Davis, 1980, 1983c). Analysis of the data produced statistically nonsignificant findings. Larger numbers and/or longer training times may provide significant findings in future studies. The levels of affective empathy (i.e. low, intermediate, high scorers) were not considered in the current study but attention to these variables in future research and in training for affective empathy using zazen (Zen) meditation is recommended.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectDissertations, Academic.en_US
dc.subjectClinical psychology.en_US
dc.titleAffective empathy training with senior citizens using Zazen (Zen) meditation.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.contributor.chairSales, Amosen_US
dc.identifier.oclc722848411en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberTucker, Inezen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberJohnson, Boben_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBrainerd, Charlesen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBergan, Johnen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9421726en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpecial Education and Rehabilitationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-26T11:28:59Z
html.description.abstractAs an individual moves into the later years of life, he or she is prone to loss of interpersonal skills and support from others. Affective empathy is considered to be a skill which assists individuals in building interpersonal relationships and thereby increasing support from others. Zazen (Zen) meditation is proposed to increase affective empathic responses. The current study involved 19 senior citizens, ages 60-77 (six males and 13 females) randomly assigned to either a control group or an experimental group. The experimental group received zazen (Zen) meditation training and the control group received an irrelevant activity (mathematical exercises). Each group received the activity for five days, three hours per day. Affective empathy was measured pretest and posttest. The pretest was the Emotional Empathic Tendency Scale (Mehrabian & Epstein, 1972) and posttest was the Empathic Concern subscale of the Interpersonal Reactivity Index (Davis, 1980, 1983c). Analysis of the data produced statistically nonsignificant findings. Larger numbers and/or longer training times may provide significant findings in future studies. The levels of affective empathy (i.e. low, intermediate, high scorers) were not considered in the current study but attention to these variables in future research and in training for affective empathy using zazen (Zen) meditation is recommended.


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