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dc.contributor.authorKinghorn, Eugene John.
dc.creatorKinghorn, Eugene John.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-31T18:15:00Zen
dc.date.available2011-10-31T18:15:00Zen
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/186636en
dc.description.abstractPrograms that specifically teach thinking for children with visual impairment(s) in the public school and are not bound to any specific subject or content area prove to be a rare commodity. The majority of the research literature for the visually impaired, addresses approaches for intellectual assessment, the dispellment of discrimination towards this population or functional living and mobility training issues. A program which takes into account what children with visual impairments can do with their available, or untapped senses, for training in thinking and thought stylization is sorely needed. A thinking framework that could prove to be generic for children with congenital and adventitious visual impairments, as well as be generic for any subject or content area that would be selectively legislated by the child, can provide a significant impact for those who have limited or complete loss/use of sight. This study adopts the learning theory developed by T. Frank Saunders in which the nature of knowledge and intellectual functioning is regarded as "... not... something one has, but something one does," and intellectual functioning cannot be viewed as "a magnitude (or) a quantity, but a skill (where) intelligence is not a thing, but a process of applying systems of integrating ideas" (Saunders, 1973, p. 14). In addition, this study also provides an illustrative case in which the thinking style (abstraction skills in a pattern) of a child with visual impairment(s) can be described and identified, contextualized, and legislated by the child in ways that will enhance her/his educational performance.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.titleThe visually impaired child: A thinking and thought stylization program.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.contributor.chairSaunders, T. Franken_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHeckman, Paul E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSchlessman-Frost, Amyen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9424968en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Administrationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.nameEd.D.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-14T22:46:19Z
html.description.abstractPrograms that specifically teach thinking for children with visual impairment(s) in the public school and are not bound to any specific subject or content area prove to be a rare commodity. The majority of the research literature for the visually impaired, addresses approaches for intellectual assessment, the dispellment of discrimination towards this population or functional living and mobility training issues. A program which takes into account what children with visual impairments can do with their available, or untapped senses, for training in thinking and thought stylization is sorely needed. A thinking framework that could prove to be generic for children with congenital and adventitious visual impairments, as well as be generic for any subject or content area that would be selectively legislated by the child, can provide a significant impact for those who have limited or complete loss/use of sight. This study adopts the learning theory developed by T. Frank Saunders in which the nature of knowledge and intellectual functioning is regarded as "... not... something one has, but something one does," and intellectual functioning cannot be viewed as "a magnitude (or) a quantity, but a skill (where) intelligence is not a thing, but a process of applying systems of integrating ideas" (Saunders, 1973, p. 14). In addition, this study also provides an illustrative case in which the thinking style (abstraction skills in a pattern) of a child with visual impairment(s) can be described and identified, contextualized, and legislated by the child in ways that will enhance her/his educational performance.


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