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dc.contributor.authorBormanis, John Curt.*
dc.creatorBormanis, John Curt.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-31T18:15:57Z
dc.date.available2011-10-31T18:15:57Z
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/186666
dc.description.abstractIn this dissertation I explore the role that religious discourses (especially the Hebrew Bible), ethnic nationalist movements, and shifting configurations of gender played in the works of German-Jewish and Irish Catholic writers during the early twentieth century. I focus on the works of Gertrud Kolmar and James Joyce because they take up oppositional and critical positions vis-a-vis not only the dominant forces of their oppression, but also towards the movements and groups which fostered their oppositional consciences. Thus, while Kolmar found a defense against German anti-Semitism in Jewish tradition, she also struggled against the misogynistic discourses within Judaism. And while Joyce was adamant in his rebellion against the British Empire and the English language, he was equally committed to challenging the parochialism, anti-Semitism, and suffocating Catholicism of the Ireland from which he fled at age 22. The works of both authors are important today because they elucidate the inextricably bound nature of ethnic, religious and gender identities, and offer insights into our continuing struggle to deal with these issues and their modern origins in the early twentieth century.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectJews in literature.en_US
dc.titleOppositional constructions of Jewishness, gender and ethnicity in the works of James Joyce (1882-1941) and Gertrud Kolmar (1894-1943) (Ireland).en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.contributor.chairSchneidau, Herbert N.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc703880060en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAiken, Susan Hardyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKosta, Barbaraen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9426227en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineComparative Cultural and Literary Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-15T13:45:47Z
html.description.abstractIn this dissertation I explore the role that religious discourses (especially the Hebrew Bible), ethnic nationalist movements, and shifting configurations of gender played in the works of German-Jewish and Irish Catholic writers during the early twentieth century. I focus on the works of Gertrud Kolmar and James Joyce because they take up oppositional and critical positions vis-a-vis not only the dominant forces of their oppression, but also towards the movements and groups which fostered their oppositional consciences. Thus, while Kolmar found a defense against German anti-Semitism in Jewish tradition, she also struggled against the misogynistic discourses within Judaism. And while Joyce was adamant in his rebellion against the British Empire and the English language, he was equally committed to challenging the parochialism, anti-Semitism, and suffocating Catholicism of the Ireland from which he fled at age 22. The works of both authors are important today because they elucidate the inextricably bound nature of ethnic, religious and gender identities, and offer insights into our continuing struggle to deal with these issues and their modern origins in the early twentieth century.


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