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dc.contributor.authorSimon, Julie Hope.
dc.creatorSimon, Julie Hope.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-31T18:18:10Z
dc.date.available2011-10-31T18:18:10Z
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/186736
dc.description.abstractThe field of sign language interpreting and interpreter education is rapidly changing to meet the needs of deaf and hearing consumers. It is not sufficient to teach merely the techniques of interpreting and to produce large numbers of interpreters who work mechanically. Interpreters must understand issues of bilingualism, biculturalism, and second language learning because they work in cross-lingual, cross-cultural settings and are responsible for ensuring successful communication among all parties involved. To accommodate these changes within the profession, it is important to understand how community members and prospective interpreters perceive the profession of interpreting. This ethnographic study focuses on students' and community members' attitudes, ideas, and beliefs about American Sign Language, American Deaf Culture, the deaf community, and the interpreting profession. A case study approach utilizing several ethnographic data collection methods is presented to assist interpreter educators and other interested persons to understand how the profession is perceived. Several themes that emerged from the data pertaining to attitudes, language fluency, bilingualism, biculturalism, and second language acquisition are analyzed and discussed in terms of their implications for interpreter preparation programs, policy, and future research.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.titleAn ethnographic study of sign language interpreter education.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.contributor.chairMcCarty, Teresa L.en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRuiz, Richarden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDavis, Jeffreyen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9426564en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineLanguage, Reading and Cultureen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-03T10:25:05Z
html.description.abstractThe field of sign language interpreting and interpreter education is rapidly changing to meet the needs of deaf and hearing consumers. It is not sufficient to teach merely the techniques of interpreting and to produce large numbers of interpreters who work mechanically. Interpreters must understand issues of bilingualism, biculturalism, and second language learning because they work in cross-lingual, cross-cultural settings and are responsible for ensuring successful communication among all parties involved. To accommodate these changes within the profession, it is important to understand how community members and prospective interpreters perceive the profession of interpreting. This ethnographic study focuses on students' and community members' attitudes, ideas, and beliefs about American Sign Language, American Deaf Culture, the deaf community, and the interpreting profession. A case study approach utilizing several ethnographic data collection methods is presented to assist interpreter educators and other interested persons to understand how the profession is perceived. Several themes that emerged from the data pertaining to attitudes, language fluency, bilingualism, biculturalism, and second language acquisition are analyzed and discussed in terms of their implications for interpreter preparation programs, policy, and future research.


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