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dc.contributor.authorFRISCHMANN, DONALD HARRY.*
dc.creatorFRISCHMANN, DONALD HARRY.es
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-31T18:56:27Zen
dc.date.available2011-10-31T18:56:27Zen
dc.date.issued1985es
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/187949en
dc.description.abstractBased upon recent field research mainly in Mexico City, Guadalajara and Cuernavaca, as well as upon the theoretical writings of Nestor García Canclini, theoreticians of the Latin American New Theatre and researchers of Latin American popular culture, the present study seeks to prove and document the existence of a distinctly new movement in Mexican popular theatre. This new popular theatre has its roots in the early part of the 20th century but has rapidly developed only since 1965. It draws upon many popular dramatic forms, such as anonymous dramas of European origen, indigenous theatre, the commedia dell'arte, the proletarian dramas resulting from the Mexican Revolution of 1910, the "teatro carpero de revista", and the age-old tradition of the roaming artist and street vendor. These forms are used as a vehicle to focus upon themes relevant to the socio-economic and political status of the disenfranchised masses, and to raise the level of consciousness of the proletarian and peasant classes regarding the problems which affect them, in order that they might act to bring about significant beneficial change. The author distinguishes among three categories of popular theatre, based upon the area of operation or form of subsistence: (1) Popular theatre within the State (Teatro Conasupo de Orientacion Campesina, 1971-76; Proyecto de Arte Escenico Popular 1976-82; Teatro Popular del INEA, 1982-); (2) Proletarian Theatre (Centro Libre de Experimentacion Teatral y Artística, CLETA); (3) Independent Popular Theatre (Grupo Cultural Zero, Cooperativa Teatro Denuncia de Felipe Santander). All three categories exhibit similar influences and share the goals described above which place them fully within the movement of the Latin American New Popular Theatre.
dc.language.isoeses
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.es
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.es
dc.titleEL NUEVO TEATRO POPULAR EN MEXICO. (SPANISH TEXT) (THEATER).es
dc.typetextes
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)es
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaes
thesis.degree.leveldoctorales
dc.identifier.proquest8514907es
thesis.degree.disciplineSpanish and Portuguesees
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegees
thesis.degree.namePh.D.es
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-14T04:59:17Z
html.description.abstractBased upon recent field research mainly in Mexico City, Guadalajara and Cuernavaca, as well as upon the theoretical writings of Nestor García Canclini, theoreticians of the Latin American New Theatre and researchers of Latin American popular culture, the present study seeks to prove and document the existence of a distinctly new movement in Mexican popular theatre. This new popular theatre has its roots in the early part of the 20th century but has rapidly developed only since 1965. It draws upon many popular dramatic forms, such as anonymous dramas of European origen, indigenous theatre, the commedia dell'arte, the proletarian dramas resulting from the Mexican Revolution of 1910, the "teatro carpero de revista", and the age-old tradition of the roaming artist and street vendor. These forms are used as a vehicle to focus upon themes relevant to the socio-economic and political status of the disenfranchised masses, and to raise the level of consciousness of the proletarian and peasant classes regarding the problems which affect them, in order that they might act to bring about significant beneficial change. The author distinguishes among three categories of popular theatre, based upon the area of operation or form of subsistence: (1) Popular theatre within the State (Teatro Conasupo de Orientacion Campesina, 1971-76; Proyecto de Arte Escenico Popular 1976-82; Teatro Popular del INEA, 1982-); (2) Proletarian Theatre (Centro Libre de Experimentacion Teatral y Artística, CLETA); (3) Independent Popular Theatre (Grupo Cultural Zero, Cooperativa Teatro Denuncia de Felipe Santander). All three categories exhibit similar influences and share the goals described above which place them fully within the movement of the Latin American New Popular Theatre.


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