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dc.contributor.advisorMishra, Shitalaen_US
dc.contributor.authorCREIGHTON, JUDITH MATLOCK.
dc.creatorCREIGHTON, JUDITH MATLOCK.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-31T18:57:21Zen
dc.date.available2011-10-31T18:57:21Zen
dc.date.issued1985en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/187975en
dc.description.abstractThis study examined the extent to which mothers of children with and without otitis-media histories differ in their perceptions of children's social behavior. Twenty-three mothers, each with two children aged 2 1/2 to 9 (30 boys, 16 girls) participated. Mothers' average age was 34. Two-thirds were full-time homemakers. Most belonged to middle-class Anglo socioeconomic status. Early recurrent otitis media (EROM) children (n = 27) had had four or more episodes before age 2 and a first episode before age 1. Mild or no otitis media (MNOM) children (n = 19) had had either fewer than four episodes before age 2 or none before age 1. Mothers rated children's social behaviors on the two-part Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory. Its intensity scale score represented frequencies with which a child showed any of 36 behaviors. Its problem scale score was the number of behaviors a mother perceived as a problem for her. Intensity scale score means did not differ significantly for EROM and MNOM children [F(1, 44) = 1.56, p ≥ .05], suggesting no differences in the frequency of occurrence of problem behaviors for the two groups. Problem scale score means differed significantly [F(1, 44) = 5.46, p < .05], suggesting that mothers perceived more behavioral problems in EROM than in MNOM children. Thirteen EROM children had conduct problems (scores above either scale's cutoff), versus two MNOM children. A significant relationship between otitis-media history and conduct problems was shown by a chi-square test [χ² (df=1)= 5.57, p < .05 . Children's age, sex, and birth order did not influence mothers' ratings. Mothers' general anxiety, measured by the Anxiety Scale Questionnaire, influenced their ratings of children's social behaviors on each individual ECBI scale, but did not have an effect after children were described as having conduct-problem or normal behavior. EROM children were rated as having conduct problems significantly more often than were MNOM children. The findings have restricted generalizability, but suggest that psychologists, pediatricians, and speech/hearing pathologists and clinicians may need to help mothers reduce children's conduct problems related to early otitis media.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectOtitis media in children.en_US
dc.subjectMother and child.en_US
dc.subjectChildren -- Conduct of life.en_US
dc.subjectInterpersonal relations in children.en_US
dc.titleMOTHERS' PERCEPTIONS OF SOCIAL BEHAVIORS OF THEIR CHILDREN WITH AND WITHOUT OTITIS MEDIA (HEARING, PARENTING, PRESCHOOL).en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.contributor.chairMishra, Shitalaen_US
dc.identifier.oclc696377508en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCalmes, Roberten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberChristopherson, Victoren_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGullo, Josephen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLamke, Leanneen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8517493en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-23T07:34:55Z
html.description.abstractThis study examined the extent to which mothers of children with and without otitis-media histories differ in their perceptions of children's social behavior. Twenty-three mothers, each with two children aged 2 1/2 to 9 (30 boys, 16 girls) participated. Mothers' average age was 34. Two-thirds were full-time homemakers. Most belonged to middle-class Anglo socioeconomic status. Early recurrent otitis media (EROM) children (n = 27) had had four or more episodes before age 2 and a first episode before age 1. Mild or no otitis media (MNOM) children (n = 19) had had either fewer than four episodes before age 2 or none before age 1. Mothers rated children's social behaviors on the two-part Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory. Its intensity scale score represented frequencies with which a child showed any of 36 behaviors. Its problem scale score was the number of behaviors a mother perceived as a problem for her. Intensity scale score means did not differ significantly for EROM and MNOM children [F(1, 44) = 1.56, p ≥ .05], suggesting no differences in the frequency of occurrence of problem behaviors for the two groups. Problem scale score means differed significantly [F(1, 44) = 5.46, p < .05], suggesting that mothers perceived more behavioral problems in EROM than in MNOM children. Thirteen EROM children had conduct problems (scores above either scale's cutoff), versus two MNOM children. A significant relationship between otitis-media history and conduct problems was shown by a chi-square test [χ² (df=1)= 5.57, p < .05 . Children's age, sex, and birth order did not influence mothers' ratings. Mothers' general anxiety, measured by the Anxiety Scale Questionnaire, influenced their ratings of children's social behaviors on each individual ECBI scale, but did not have an effect after children were described as having conduct-problem or normal behavior. EROM children were rated as having conduct problems significantly more often than were MNOM children. The findings have restricted generalizability, but suggest that psychologists, pediatricians, and speech/hearing pathologists and clinicians may need to help mothers reduce children's conduct problems related to early otitis media.


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