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dc.contributor.advisorDavis, Jimen_US
dc.contributor.authorPETERSEN-OLSON, SUSAN KAY.
dc.creatorPETERSEN-OLSON, SUSAN KAY.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-31T19:02:07Z
dc.date.available2011-10-31T19:02:07Z
dc.date.issued1985en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/188126
dc.description.abstractManagers spend 75-80% of their time communicating interpersonally. Ironically, communication skills are consistently listed as a major weakness of today's managers. Furthermore, management theorists contend that management students have been mis-educated for the job of managing. This study focuses on the relationship between attitudes toward communication and managerial success. Communication attitude was measured by Hart, Carlson and Eadie's RHETSEN Scale. Success was measured as promotions in relation to years worked and salary in relation to age. The hypothesis was that the Rhetorically Sensitive manager will be most successful. Two three-way analyses of variance were performed to assess this relationship. The results indicated no significant difference in success level for the Rhetorically Sensitive manager. The exploratory research suggested several directions for future research. Implications of these findings and recommendations for future research are noted.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectCommunication in management.en_US
dc.subjectPersonnel management.en_US
dc.subjectCommunication in organizations.en_US
dc.subjectManagement -- Employee participation.en_US
dc.subjectInterpersonal relations.en_US
dc.titleRHETORICAL SENSITIVITY AND MANAGERIAL SUCCESS (FLEXIBILITY, COMMUNICATION, ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR).en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.identifier.oclc696806073en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNott, Daveen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8603346en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCommunicationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
dc.description.noteThis item was digitized from a paper original and/or a microfilm copy. If you need higher-resolution images for any content in this item, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
dc.description.admin-noteOriginal file replaced with corrected file April 2023.
refterms.dateFOA2018-07-02T09:52:24Z
html.description.abstractManagers spend 75-80% of their time communicating interpersonally. Ironically, communication skills are consistently listed as a major weakness of today's managers. Furthermore, management theorists contend that management students have been mis-educated for the job of managing. This study focuses on the relationship between attitudes toward communication and managerial success. Communication attitude was measured by Hart, Carlson and Eadie's RHETSEN Scale. Success was measured as promotions in relation to years worked and salary in relation to age. The hypothesis was that the Rhetorically Sensitive manager will be most successful. Two three-way analyses of variance were performed to assess this relationship. The results indicated no significant difference in success level for the Rhetorically Sensitive manager. The exploratory research suggested several directions for future research. Implications of these findings and recommendations for future research are noted.


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