• Characterization of a Gene that Responds to Mitochondrial Retrograde Regulation in Arabidopsis thaliana

      Sepulveda, Jennifer; Rhoads, David M.; School of Plant Sciences (2011-11-04)
      The Rhoads Lab found an Arabidopsis gene (At5g40690) that encodes for a protein similar to yeast ATPase Assembly Proteins (AAPs), which is strongly increased in expression by MRR and during plant stresses such as pathogen attack. Characterization of At5g40690 will be performed by the analysis of knock out (KO) lines, constitutive expressor (CE) lines in comparison to wild-type using northern blots. If this gene is an AAP, then this will be the first AAP in plants to be extensively studied in relation to MRR and stress responses, and will provide researchers with a better understanding of MRR and define a new category of proteins involved in stress response. Findings will give a better understanding of heat stress in crops such as Zea mays.
    • Deposition of CuInS₂ Absorber Layer for a Prototype Solar Cell

      Fang, Yizhou; Jiang, Feng; Muscat, Anthony J.; Chemical and Environmental Engineering (2011-11-04)
      A copper indium disulfide (CuInS₂ or CIS) film could potentially be used as the absorber layer in a solar cell that converts solar energy into electricity. CuInS₂ was chosen to lower the cost and environmental impact of manufacturing as an alternate to Si solar cells. The objective of this project is to deposit a uniform CuInS₂ film with a thickness of 2-3 μm. Both spin-coating and painting methods were compared. The substrate, oxidation method, and sulfurization temperature were varied and characterized.
    • Renegotiating the Interface Between the Built and Natural Environments

      Johnson, Nicholas (2011-11-04)
      As human consumption and energy production continue to negatively a ect our environment, a re-conceptualization of our relationship to the wider world becomes a necessary step in the coexistence of humankind and nature. Modern methods of building have sought to establish a universal conception of human comfort that is disconnected from the realities of the speci c and varied climates in which we live. The building envelope is seen as a barrier to nature, a fortress where we have complete control over the parameters of our environment. This degree of control ultimately requires an unlimited source of energy. Through development of emerging material systems and technological integration, this project seeks to create a dialog between interior and exterior environments, recognizing that the two should be connected. This re-envisioned interface responds directly to changing environmental conditions through formal and material adaptations which create a symbiotic relationship between the built and natural worlds