• 1983 Pre-Season Trap Catch of Boll Weevil (Coloptera: Curculionidae) in Western Arizona Including a Comparison with the 1982 Catch

      Worth, P. W. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1984-02)
      An adult boll weevil (Anthonomus grandis complex) trapping network was organized in the major cotton producing areas of western Arizona for the first four months of 1982 and 1983. The results for each year are summarized as the mean number of adult boll weevils caught per grandlure baited trap and adjusted for the number of days each trap was in operation. Where possible, the 6 major cropping areas were subdivided into trapping sectors which permitted more detailed analysis. The results indicate the boll weevil expanded its range in western Arizona between 1982 and 1983. In 1982, they were trapped in 432 of the sectors and in 1983, 96% of the sectors. The results also show an increase in population size between 1982 and 1983. The mean number of boll weevils BW caught per trap per day was 1 to 291 times greater in 1983 depending on trapping sector.
    • An Analysis of Hedging Strategies for Arizona Cotton Producers

      Torok, Steven J.; Haden, Kimberly L.; Arizona State University; Oklahoma State University (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1984-02)
      This study compared selected hedging strategies for Arizona upland cotton producers including a no- hedge, a planting hedge, and several technical hedging strategies for the time period 1974-82. Technical hedging strategies relied upon forecasting methods to signal the placing and lifting of hedges. Forecasting methods employed included moving averages, exponential smoothing and linear regression analysis. Hedging strategies were plotted in regions of preference relative to no-hedge and planting hedge strategies.
    • Biology

      Lingren, P. D.; Western Cotton Research Laboratory (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1984-02)
    • Boll Weevil Population Correlated with Weather, Cotton Plow-Under and Total Cotton Acreage

      Chandler, Cherry A.; Arizona Commission of Agriculture and Horticulture (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1984-02)
    • Breeding for Resistance to Pink Bollworm

      Wilson, F. D.; Western Cotton Research Laboratory (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1984-02)
    • Caducous Bract Cottons

      Muramoto, H.; Sherman, R.; Department of Plant Sciences (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1984-02)
    • Chemical Termination -- 1

      Bariola, L. A.; Henneberry, T. J.; Western Cotton Research Laboratory (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1984-02)
    • Chemical Termination -- 2

      Ehlig, C. F.; Western Cotton Research Laboratory (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1984-02)
    • Comparison of Major Upland Varieties

      Farr, C. R. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1984-02)
    • Cotton Insect Genetics

      Bartlett, A. C.; Western Cotton Research Laboratory (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1984-02)
    • Cotton Lint Quality and Relative Value at Different Harvest Dates

      Kittock, D. L.; Daugherty, L. S.; Selley, R. A. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1984-02)
    • Cotton Planting Date and Planting Rate

      Kittock, D. L.; Taylor, B. B.; Cluff, R.; Thatcher, M. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1984-02)
      DPL 41 and Pima S-5 cotton were planted at low, medium, and high planting rates on April 12, April 27, and May 10 on the Safford Experimental Farm in 1983. Heavy rains in late September and early October reduced lint yields. Pima S-5 produced 66% as much lint as DPL 41. Both varieties had the highest lint yield when planted on April 27. The highest planting rate produced the highest yield for DPL 41, while the medium planting rate produced the most lint for Pima S-5 on April 27.
    • Cotton Temperature and Reflectance as Related to Drip Irrigation Management

      Matthias, A. D.; Bamtraf, A. M.; Department of Soils, Water and Engineering (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1984-02)
    • Deficit Irrigation with a Drip System

      Pennington, D. A. .; Taylor, B. B.; Stedman, S. W.; Malcuit, J. E.; Hitz, T. S (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1984-02)
    • Double Cropping Cotton after Small Grain in Graham County

      Kittock, D. L.; Taylor, B. B.; Daugherty, L. S.; Cluff, R. E.; Thatcher, M. L.; Romney, P. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1984-02)
      Several upland cotton varieties and one Pima cotton variety were planted and watered up after Poco barley and Yecora Rojo wheat on the Safford Experimental Farm in 1983. Three upland varieties were planted and watered up on July 2. McNair 235 produced the most lint for all three late planting dates. Pima cotton produced the lowest yields. Single cropped DPL 90 produced $8.47 more income/acre than McNair 235, following Poco barley. However, double cropped cotton and barley produced $57.96 more/acre than single cropped cotton, followed by single cropped wheat.
    • Effect of PIX on Upland Cotton Yield

      Farr, C. R. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1984-02)
    • Effects of Insecticide Applications on Pink Bollworm Pheremone Trap Catches

      Huber, E. T.; Chesser, C. E. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1984-02)
    • Estimating Cotton Yields Using Small-Format Aerial Photography

      Parton, M. C.; Mulrean, E. N.; Department of Arid Lands Studies; Department of Plant Pathology (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1984-02)
      In 1981, the University of Arizona's Department of Plant Pathology and Office of Arid Lands Studies (Arizona Remote Sensing Center) began a joint research project to map and estimate concomitant reductions in yield caused by Phymatotrichum root rot (PRR) using simulated orbital and airborne imagery. With support from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative States Research Service and NASA-Ames Research Center, substantial progress has been made in improving estimates of yield. While work to date has been limited to cotton, future studies will include additional crops and other diseases.
    • Evapotranspiration Estimates for Drip Irrigated Cotton

      Matthias, A. D.; Pennington, D. A.; Steadman, S. W. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1984-02)
    • Fruiting Behavior of Drip-Irrigated Cotton

      Cain, C. J.; Hofmann, W. C.; Taylor, B. B. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1984-02)