• Variety Evaluation with Early Harvest for Weevil Control

      Farr, C. R. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-03)
    • Short Staple Variety Demonstration

      Thacker, Gary; Marana Agricultural Center (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-03)
    • Narrow Row Cotton Evaluation, Marana Agricultural Center

      Thacker, Gary W. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-03)
      In a preliminary, unreplicated test, cotton was planted in 40 inch and 27 inch rows on April 10 and again on May 1. Narrow rows outyielded 40 inch rows at both planting dates. The yield difference between the row spacing treatments was greatest in the May 1 planting. Both row spacings had higher yields when planted on the later date, as did both the DPL 90 and ST506 varieties used in the test.
    • The Effects of Burst Yield Booster on DPL 61

      Hofmann, W. C.; Else, P. T. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-03)
      The third year was completed of a study designed to evaluate the effects of Burst Yield Booster, a cytokinin based plant growth regulator, on upland cotton. Five treatments were included in the 1986 experiment, which varied application timing, rate, and frequency. Consistent with our studies of the past two seasons, no significant differences in yield were observed.
    • Development of Pink Bollworm Population in Field Cages Containing Deltapine Nextaried and Nectariless Cottons

      Flint, Hollis M.; Wilson, F. Douglas; Western Cotton Research Laboratory (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-03)
      The development of populations of pink bollworm, Pectinophora gossypiella (Saunders) in 0.003 ha field cages containing 'Deltapine 61' (DPL-61) or a closely related nectariless cultivar 'Deltapine NSL' (DPL-NSL) was studied at the University of Arizona Maricopa Agricultural Center, Maricopa, AZ. Boll infestations were significantly lower in cages of DPL-NSL and total catches of moths in gossyplure-baited Delta traps at the end of the season were lower in these cages. The overall seasonal increases were 15.3- fold for DPL-NSL and 21.4 fold for DPL-61, a highly significant 29% reduction for DPLNSL.
    • Irrigation Termination Under a Volunteer Grower Boll Weevil Program

      Farr, C. R. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-03)
    • Lint Yield of Several Cotton Varieties Planted on 5 Dates at 3 Locations in Arizona in 1986

      Kittock, D. L.; Hofmann, W. C. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-03)
      There were some wide variations in cotton variety performance at five planting dates among locations and years. However, on an average, DP 90 and DP 77 performed best when planted between 28 March and 24 April. Stoneville 506 and DP 50 averaged best for May plantings and DP 20, Stoneville 112, and DP 50 averaged best for early June plantings.
    • 1986 Publications of the Western Cotton Research Laboratory, USDA, ARS

      College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-03
    • High Yielding Short Season Cotton Production in Arizona

      Tollefson, Scott (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-03)
    • Short Staple Variety Trial, Cochise County, 1986

      Clark, Lee J.; Young, Deborah (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-03)
    • Short Staple Variety Demonstration

      Clapp, Carl; Stedman, Sam (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-03)
    • Outlook on Cotton Markets and Marketing for 1987

      Firch, Robert S. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-03)
    • Nitrogen Stabilizer Effect on Nitrate Nitrogen Management in Soils

      Farr, C. R. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-03)
    • Cotton Variety Trians, Greenlee County, 1986

      Clark, Lee J.; DeRosa, Edith (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-03)
    • An Evaluation of the BioHUmaNetics Cotton Growth Program

      Hofmann, W. C.; Else, P. T. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-03)
      Plant growth products manufactured by BioHumaNetics, Inc. were evaluated in 1986 for a second consecutive year in the same field at the Maricopa Agricultural Center. Treatments included: 1) no fertilizers added, 2) standard fertilization recommended for the farm, and 3) a treatment schedule prescribed by BioHumaNetics. The non fertilized treatment had a significantly lower total yield than the two fertilized treatments.
    • The Importance of Residual Soil Nitrate in Upland Cotton Production Using Subsurface Drip Irrigation

      Doerge, Thomas A.; Tucker, T. Curt; Fangmeier, D. D. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-03)
      The importance of residual soil nitrogen (N) in the production of upland cotton in Central Arizona has not been adequately studied. A subsurface drip irrigation experiment was conducted at the Maricopa Agricultural Center to examine the effect of residual soil nitrate content on lint yields of upland cotton, and to evaluate the validity of current cotton petiole nitrate interpretations under high yielding conditions. Different levels of water and N fertilizers applied to the plot area in previous years had resulted in a range of residual NO₃-N content ranging from 36 to 166 lbs /acre. Lint yields increased from 2.8 to 4.3 bales /acre as residual soil N increased from 5.7 to 27.7 ppm NO₃-N although the correlation between yield and soil N was relatively low. This was thought to be due to difficulty in obtaining soil samples that accurately reflect the true plant availability of N in soils irrigated with drip systems. The interpretation of cotton petiole data under high yielding conditions (> 4 bales/acre) proved to be essentially the same as that currently recommended for conventional furrow irrigated cotton.
    • Plant Growth and Seed Cotton Yield of Upland Cotton Fertilized with Liquid Sewage Sludge

      Day, A. D.; Taylor, B. B.; Pepper, I. K.; Minnich, M. M.; Department of Plant Sciences | Department of Animal Sciences; Department of Soil and Water Science (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-03)
      Seedling emergence, plant establishment, plant height, and seed cotton yield for cotton grown with liquid sewage sludge were similar to the seedling emergence, plant establishment, plant height, and seed cotton yield for cotton grown with recommended inorganic fertilizer. High applications of liquid sewage sludge decreased water penetration in Pima clay loam soil.
    • Controlling Purple Nutsedge on Fallowed Ground with EPTC and Butylate

      Chernicky, J. P.; Heathman, E. S.; Stedman, S. W.; Barstow, B.; Department of Plant Science (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-03)
      Field research was conducted at Yuma and Goodyear, AZ on fallowed ground to measure the response of purple nutsedge to butylate and EPTC (Goodyear only). At Yuma, the greatest reduction in the number of live tubers resulted when two years of fallow were combined with annual summer application of 3.3 lb/A of butylate. At Goodyear, butylate and EPTC were more effective at controlling purple nutsedge when applied in early July vs early September. Also, one timely application of EPTC or butylate made in July was more successful in reducing the number of live tubers than two applications (July, Sept). September herbicide treatments were not as effective with an irrigation compared to without.
    • Whitefly Adults in Okra-Leaf and Normal-Leaf Cotton

      Wilson, F. D.; Butler, G. D. Jr.; Western Cotton Research Laboratory (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-03)
      The sweet potato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) continues to be a serious pest of cotton and an important vector of several virus diseases of fall vegetables. In our search for resistant germplasm, we counted adult whiteflies on cotton cultivars and breeding stocks in AZ and Israel. At Maricopa (MAC), seven of 19 cottons had significantly fewer whiteflies than the check, 'Stoneville 825'. Five of the seven were okra-leaf and two were normal-leaf cottons. In another experiment at MAC, an okra-leaf cotton did not have fewer whiteflies than a normal-leaf one. At several locations in Israel, the okraleaf cotton, BD-12, had significantly fewer whiteflies than a number of normal-leaf cottons.
    • Effect of RESPOND and PIX on Short Staple Cotton, 1986

      Briggs, R. E.; Ledbetter, C. A.; Nelson, J. M. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-03)