• High Yielding Short Season Cotton Production in Arizona

      Tollefson, Scott (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-03)
    • 1986 Publications of the Western Cotton Research Laboratory, USDA, ARS

      College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-03
    • The Evolution of Subsurface Drip Irrigation on Sundance Farms

      Wuertz, Howard; Tollefson, Scott (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-03)
    • Lint Yield of Four Seed Qualities of Stoneville 825 Upland Cotton Planted at 3 Locations, 3 on Planting Dates and at 3 Planting Rates in Arizona in 1986

      Kittock, D. L.; Hofmann, W. C. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-03)
      Low quality Stoneville 825 seed produced reduced stands and, in most cases, reduced lint yields when planted at 3 dates and 3 planting dates at 3 locations in Arizona. Reduced lint yields were explained by reduced stands. Highest lint yield was obtained from the second plantings, 24 and 21 April at Marana and Safford, respectively.
    • Percolation of Soluble Constituents Under Cotton Fertilized with Municipal Sewage Sludge

      Minnich, M. M.; Pepper, I. L.; Day, A. D.; Taylor, B. B. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-03)
      Data on the potential salts and organics leaching under cotton fertilized with municipal sewage sludge is necessary to delineate best management practices when cotton is fertilized in this manner.
    • Urban Wastewater and Economic Potential for Cotton Growers and Taxpayers

      Goldammer, Teddy J.; Wilson, Paul N.; Wade, James C. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-03)
      Wastewater from urban areas can be a valuable source of water and plant nutrients for neighboring agricultural producers, particularly in arid regions of the world. A derived effluent demand function for agricultural producers near Tucson, Arizona, reveals a potential demand of 11,000 acre-feet under present price and delivery system conditions. In this case, wastewater could be exchanged for ground water and both the urban and rural areas would gain.
    • The Importance of Residual Soil Nitrate in Upland Cotton Production Using Subsurface Drip Irrigation

      Doerge, Thomas A.; Tucker, T. Curt; Fangmeier, D. D. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-03)
      The importance of residual soil nitrogen (N) in the production of upland cotton in Central Arizona has not been adequately studied. A subsurface drip irrigation experiment was conducted at the Maricopa Agricultural Center to examine the effect of residual soil nitrate content on lint yields of upland cotton, and to evaluate the validity of current cotton petiole nitrate interpretations under high yielding conditions. Different levels of water and N fertilizers applied to the plot area in previous years had resulted in a range of residual NO₃-N content ranging from 36 to 166 lbs /acre. Lint yields increased from 2.8 to 4.3 bales /acre as residual soil N increased from 5.7 to 27.7 ppm NO₃-N although the correlation between yield and soil N was relatively low. This was thought to be due to difficulty in obtaining soil samples that accurately reflect the true plant availability of N in soils irrigated with drip systems. The interpretation of cotton petiole data under high yielding conditions (> 4 bales/acre) proved to be essentially the same as that currently recommended for conventional furrow irrigated cotton.
    • Pink Bollworm Resistance and Lint Yield of a Nectariless, Okra-Leaf Germplasm Line

      Wilson, F. Douglas; Flint, Hollis M.; Western Cotton Research Laboratory (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-03)
      A nectariless, okra -leaf germplasm line of cotton, Gossvpium hirsutum L., designated WC-12NL, was compared with a nectaried, regular leaf commercial cultivar, 'Deltapine 61' (DPL-61) at two locations, Maricopa, AZ and Brawley, CA. At Maricopa, two and three insecticide applications were required for control of pink bollworm, Pectinophora gossypiella (Saunders), on WC-12NL and DPL-61, respectively. At Brawley, six and nine applications were required. Lint yield of WC-12NL was 30% higher than that of DPL-61 at Maricopa, while at Brawley, lint yields were about equal.
    • Whitefly Adults in Okra-Leaf and Normal-Leaf Cotton

      Wilson, F. D.; Butler, G. D. Jr.; Western Cotton Research Laboratory (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-03)
      The sweet potato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) continues to be a serious pest of cotton and an important vector of several virus diseases of fall vegetables. In our search for resistant germplasm, we counted adult whiteflies on cotton cultivars and breeding stocks in AZ and Israel. At Maricopa (MAC), seven of 19 cottons had significantly fewer whiteflies than the check, 'Stoneville 825'. Five of the seven were okra-leaf and two were normal-leaf cottons. In another experiment at MAC, an okra-leaf cotton did not have fewer whiteflies than a normal-leaf one. At several locations in Israel, the okraleaf cotton, BD-12, had significantly fewer whiteflies than a number of normal-leaf cottons.
    • Lint Yield of Several Cotton Varieties Planted on 5 Dates at 3 Locations in Arizona in 1986

      Kittock, D. L.; Hofmann, W. C. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-03)
      There were some wide variations in cotton variety performance at five planting dates among locations and years. However, on an average, DP 90 and DP 77 performed best when planted between 28 March and 24 April. Stoneville 506 and DP 50 averaged best for May plantings and DP 20, Stoneville 112, and DP 50 averaged best for early June plantings.
    • Development and Fecundity of Aphis gossypii (Homoptera: Aphididae) on Cotton

      Akey, David H.; Butler, George D.; Western Cotton Research Laboratory (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-03)
      Cotton aphids. Aphis gossypii. from a source near Phoenix. AZ were found to have an optimal developmental temperature of 27.5 °C with a developmental time of 5 days. Fecundity was optimal at 25 °C with 2.85 mean nymphs/day. Both development and fecundity were linear. The optimal temperature for fecundity was higher than those previously reported for cotton aphids in more moderate climates.
    • Antibiosis in Cotton to Pink Bollworm

      Wilson, F. Douglas; Szaro, Jayne L.; Stapp, Benny R.; Western Cotton Research Laboratory (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-03)
      Ninety-nine germplasm lines and a resistant check line of cotton, Gossypium hirsutum L., were infested artificially in the field with eggs of pink bollworm (PBW), Pectinophora gossypiella (Saunders), and evaluated for an antibiosis type of resistance to the insect and also for yield potential. All 99 lines came from crosses of well -adapted cultivars, or the nectariless, or nectariless-okra-leaf versions of those cultivars, with previously identified sources of antibiosis (a type of resistance that affects the growth and development of the insect once inside the boll). Twenty-three of the 99 were selected for low PBW damage or for a combination of high lint yield and low damage.
    • Short Staple Variety Demonstration

      Thacker, Gary; Marana Agricultural Center (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-03)
    • Effect of RESPOND and PIX on Short Staple Cotton, 1986

      Briggs, R. E.; Ledbetter, C. A.; Nelson, J. M. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-03)
    • Responses of Glasshouse-Grown Cotton to Irrigation with Carbon Dioxide-Saturated Water

      Mauney, J. R.; Hendrix, D. L. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-03)
    • Variety Evaluation with Early Harvest for Weevil Control

      Farr, C. R. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-03)
    • Regional Variety Test

      Fisher, W. D.; Pegelow, E. J. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-03)
    • Irrigation and Nitrogen Effects on Plant Hormones, Boll Retention, and Growth of Fruiting Branches

      Guinn, Gene; Brummett, Donald L.; Western Cotton Research Laboratory (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-03)
      An experiment was conducted in Phoenix in 1986 to determine effects of water and N deficits on ABA and IAA concentrations in young bolls and their abscission zones in relation to boll retention, and to determine the effects of N on growth of fruiting branches through the season. Water deficit decreased boll retention, decreased the concentration of free IAA in bolls and their abscission zones, and increased ABA in bolls and abscission zones. But, the concentration of ester IAA increased with water deficit (in contrast to free IAA). Because ester IAA resists degradation during stress, it may facilitate recovery when stress is relieved and some of it is converted to free IAA. N-deficiency symptoms were mild and did not appear early in the season. N had no effect on the ABA and IAA contents of bolls and their abscission zones, and had only a small effect on growth of fruiting branches. The N test is to be repeated in 1987 when N deficiency should be more severe.
    • Controlling Purple Nutsedge on Fallowed Ground with EPTC and Butylate

      Chernicky, J. P.; Heathman, E. S.; Stedman, S. W.; Barstow, B.; Department of Plant Science (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-03)
      Field research was conducted at Yuma and Goodyear, AZ on fallowed ground to measure the response of purple nutsedge to butylate and EPTC (Goodyear only). At Yuma, the greatest reduction in the number of live tubers resulted when two years of fallow were combined with annual summer application of 3.3 lb/A of butylate. At Goodyear, butylate and EPTC were more effective at controlling purple nutsedge when applied in early July vs early September. Also, one timely application of EPTC or butylate made in July was more successful in reducing the number of live tubers than two applications (July, Sept). September herbicide treatments were not as effective with an irrigation compared to without.
    • Short Staple Variety Demonstration, Graham County, 1986

      Clark, Lee J.; Cluff, Ronald E. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-03)