• Cotton Irrigation Scheduling, Safford Agricultural Center, 1988

      Clark, L. J.; Carpenter, E. W.; Scherer, T.; Slack, D.; Fox, F.; Silvertooth, Jeff; Isbell, Joan (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1989-03)
      Cotton was grown using historical evapotranspiration data in the Erie method a checkbook method using real-time AZMET weather data, an infrared thermometer, and a faint manager to schedule irrigations. Yields of 4 bales per acre were recorded with no significant differences between the scheduling methods. Differences were seen in the plant growth and maturity. More refining will be done in subsequent investigations.
    • Cotton Variety Observation, Safford Agricultural Center 1988

      Clark, L. J.; Carpenter, E. W.; Silvertooth, Jeff; Isbell, Joan (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1989-03)
      Twenty-four short staple cotton varieties were compared in a strip trial on the Safford Agricultural Center, 15 of which were seen for the first time, 7 of which were acala varieties from New Mexico. Three varieties, BR 110, Delta Pine Experimental 7124-293, and Northrup King KNX111 (now KC 311) exceeded the yield of the standard variety DP 90 by 12.6 %, 8.1 %, and 4 %, respectively. Other new cultivars that performed well but didn't exceed the yield of the standard, were HYP 1211, HYP 274, and Acala 2745. The first 2 are hybrids supplied by Dr. Warner Fisher, the latter is an experimental acala from New Mexico State University. Per acre values were affected by lint value as well as lint yield per acre. Using a value of $0.65/lb for New Mexico acala and $0.56/lb for Delta Pine acala, Acala 2745 produced $975/ac compared with DP 90's $916/ac and BR 110's $1031/ac.
    • The Effects of Methyl Bromide Fumigants on Verticillium Wilt on Two Varieties of Short Staple Cotton, Safford Agricultural Center, 1988

      Clark, L. J.; Carpenter, E. W.; Silvertooth, Jeff; Isbell, Joan (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1989-03)
      Methyl bromid/chloropicrin formulations were applied to strips in the verticillium nursery at the Safford Agricultural Center where two varieties of short staple cotton were subsequently planted. More robust plant growth and reduced incidence of disease were noted with some of the treatments. Yield increases over the check plots were also seen. A study of the residual effects of the treatments will be performed in 1989.
    • Short and Long Staple Variety Trials, Greenlee County, 1988

      DeRosa, E.; Clark, L. J.; Silvertooth, Jeff; Isbell, Joan (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1989-03)
      Two short staple variety trials and 1 long staple variety trial were harvested in Greenlee county in 1988. In the short staple trial comparing the new and experimental New Mexico acalas with 2 other lower quality varieties, Genhains new GC 260 was the top yielding variety with 1,087 pounds of lint per acre, but it came in fifth when comparing dollar value per acre because of the premium structure for the New Mexico acalas. Two new experimental acalas, 2745 and B510, produced the highest income per acre. The short staple trial, which tested longer - season varieties, had problems with low micronaire values. The newly released 1517-88 variety produced the top yield and produced the most income per acre. Two of the experimental long staple varieties topped the yield of S-6 and 3 of the 7 varieties tested yielded over 650 pounds of lint per acre.
    • Short Staple Variety Demonstration, Graham County, 1988

      Clark, L. J.; Cluff, R. E.; Silvertooth, Jeff; Isbell, Joan (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1989-03)
      Cotton lint yields in the variety trials in Graham county were higher than the 1987 yields by close to 200 pounds per acre. Two varieties, BR 110 and NK KNX 111 (now KC 311) yielded more than DP 90 at the Thatcher site, the highest yield being 1,569 pounds of lint per acre. In Eden, DP 90 was the highest yielding variety with 1,237 pounds of lint per acre. The New Mexico acalas didn't yield as much lint per acre as the top yielding varieties, but with 1988's premium, produced substantial income per acre. In Thatcher the highest yielding acala produced $861 per acre compared with BR 110's $910, whereas in Eden the highest yielding acala produced $736 per acre against DP 90's $717.
    • Short Staple Variety Trial, Cochise County, 1988

      Clark, L. J.; Schwennesen, E.; Silvertooth, Jeff; Isbell, Joan (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1989-03)
      Nine acala varieties were grown in the Cochise area of Cochise county. An experimental New Mexico variety B510 was the top yielder in the test, producing 1,287 pounds of lint per acre. The top variety in 1987, 1517-77BR, was next to the bottom in the 1988 test, probably due to low plant population. Variety characteristics such as plant height, wilt susceptibility, relative maturity and lint turnout are quantified in the study along with final plant populations and lint quality. Information on cotton variety strip trials implemented in the county is also given.
    • Soil Amendments on Cotton, Safford Agricultural Center, 1988

      Clark, L. J.; Carpenter, E. W.; Silvertooth, Jeff; Isbell, Joan (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1989-03)
      Cotton was grown in the fourth year of a soil amendment trial that evaluated 4 different soil amendments in 12 treatments on the Safford Agricultural Center. Yields varied from 1,659 to 1,392 pounds of lint per acre but none of the treatments yielded statistically different from the check. The higher yields were seen in the treatments with high and medium rates of soil sulfur, Boligrow, or gypsum, the lower yields were seen in the treatments with low rates of those amendments or with a biological amendment, but the conclusion of the study is that soil amendments did not significantly increase yields on that soil with its EC value of 2.3 dS/m. Crop and fiber quality measurements are reported here.