• Short Staple Variety Demonstration, Maricopa Agricultural Center, 1989

      Malcuit, J.; Silvertooth, J.; Silvertooth, Jeff; Bantlin, Marguerite (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1990)
      A short staple variety trial was conducted on the demonstration farm, at the Maricopa Agricultural Center in 1989. Twenty varieties, received from various seed companies, were entered into the test. Results from the analysis showed significant differences among varieties with no observable performance trend in terms of maturity types (long or short season). The lint yields in this test ranged from 4679 to 3353 lbs. acre⁻¹ for DPL90, and S55 respectively.
    • Comparison of Three Irrigation Scheduling Methods and Evaluation of Irrigation Leaching Characteristics

      Scherer, T.; Slack, D.; Watson, J.; Fox, F.; Silvertooth, Jeff; Bantlin, Marguerite (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1990)
      Three methods were used to schedule irrigations during 1989 on replicated plots at the Maricopa Ag Center using DPL 90 cotton. This is a continuation of the research initiated in 1988 using the same field The three methods were; a soil water balance model based on historic consumptive use curves, a soil water balance model based on the Modified Penman Equation and daily weather (AZMET), and infrared thermometry using the C.W.S.I. A potassium- bromide conservative tracer was applied at selected sites in the plots to evaluate leaching characteristics. The irrigation scheduling test was again duplicated at the Safford Experiment Station and is presented in another report. Results from this years data indicate that there was no significant difference in yield among the three methods. However, as in 1988 there was a significant difference in water applied with historic consumptive use (ERIE) the lowest and the Penman equation method (CHECKBOOK) the highest.
    • Short Staple Demonstrations, Graham County, 1989

      Clark, Lee. J.; Cluff, Ronald E.; Silvertooth, Jeff; Bantlin, Marguerite (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1990)
      Short- staple variety trials were grown in two locations in Graham County in 1989. Exceptional weather conditions, coupled with good management practices, provided record cotton yields in the Safford valley. Delta Pine 77 was the highest yielding variety in the Thatcher location with a yield of 1740 pounds of lint per acre. An experimental acala from New Mexico came in second in this triad ahead of Delta Pine 90. Delta Pine 90 was the highest yielding variety in the Eden area with a yield of 1196 pounds per acre. Data on percent first pick plant height and plant populations are presented for each variety in each location. Graphs of heat units received each day throughout the growing season at the AZMET station on the Safford Agricultural Center are presented for 1988 and 1989.
    • Pima Cotton Improvement

      Turcotte, E. L.; Percy, R. G.; Silvertooth, Jeff; Bantlin, Marguerite (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1990)
      Five experimental strains, P67, P69, P71, P72, P73, and Pima S -6 were grown in Regional tests at eight locations in 1989. P69 averaged highest in mean yield across locations followed by P73, Pima S-6, P71, P67 and P72. The difference in mean yield between P69, the highest yielding entry, and Pima S-6 was 35 pounds of lint per acre. Pima S-6 was the latest maturing and tallest entry in the Regional test at Maricopa. Pima S-6 also showed less tolerance to heat stress than the experimental strains. The experimental strains had longer, stronger, finer, and more whitish fiber than Pima S-6.
    • Influence of Multiple Applications of PIX on Long and Short Staple Cotton, Safford 1989

      Clark, Lee J.; Carpenter, Eddie W.; Silvertooth, Jeff; Bantlin, Marguerite (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1990)
      A four-by-four factorial experiment was performed on the Safford Agricultural Center to determine if CaZn, Foliar Triggrr or Soil Triggrr would cause increases in lint yields on short or long staple cotton. Four levels of PIX were used to see if there would be any interaction between PIX and the other materials. The results in 1989 showed that CaZn and the Trier products did not increase yields, the levels of PIX did not increase yields and there was no interaction between them. Very favorable weather conditions and good crop management kept plants from growing vegetative and prevented crop stress, thus reducing the opportunity for the plant growth regulators to increase yields. Yields were excellent with over 1700 and 1600 pounds of lint per acre for short and long staple cotton, respectively.
    • Planting Date and Susceptibility to Pink Bollworm

      Brown, P.; Huber, R.; Moore, L.; Silvertooth, Jeff; Bantlin, Marguerite (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1990)
      The susceptibility of cotton to spring emergence of pink bollworm (PBW) was evaluated for a variety of planting dates in Pinal Maricopa, LaPaz and Yuma counties using historical climate records and heat-unit-based models that predict PBW emergence and cotton development. Early planted cotton proved most susceptible to the PBW emergence, however, cotton type (shoe vs. long staple) and springtime weather conditions both played an important role in overall susceptibility.
    • Effect of Date of Planting and Irrigation Termination on Pink Bollworm Populations in Pima and Upland Cotton

      Terry, L. I.; Silvertooth, J. C.; Summers, C.; Silvertooth, Jeff; Bantlin, Marguerite (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1990)
      Field experiments conducted in 1989 comparing effects of planting date and irrigation termination date on pink bollworm in both in- season and overwintering infestations indicated different responses depending upon the location and type of cotton. Tests were located at: Yuma Agricultural Center; Marana Agricultural Center; and Maricopa Agricultural Center. Infestations at Yuma ranged from 0% at early flowering to 80% infested bolls prior to harvest. Marana had equally high infestations at the end of the season, while Maricopa had the lowest infestations ranging from 2% to 5% for Pima and 3 %-17% for Upland. Planting date or species of cotton did not affect early infestation. Data comparing plots for overwintering infestations are still being evaluated. Continuous insecticide treatments were made at all locations after squaring began.
    • Early-season Cotton Square Removal with Ethephon and Initiation of Pink Bollworm Infestations

      Henneberry, T. J.; Bariola, L. A.; Chu, C. C.; Meng, T. Jr.; Deeter, B.; Silvertooth, Jeff; Bantlin, Marguerite (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1990)
      Ethephon applied at rates of 0.50 or 0.75 lb AI/acre removed early-season squares and delayed initiation of pink bollworm, Pectinophora gossvpiella (Saunders) infestations and reduced the number of infested bolls on early-season fruiting branches, without affecting yield except for ethephon at 0.751b AI /acre at one location. Higher rates of application reduced yields. In most cases, ethephon treatments delayed flowering but plants compensated for removal of early- season squares and equalled or surpassed accumulated flowering of untreated control plants later in the season.
    • Effect of Irrigation Termination Date on Defolation and Yield of Upland Cotton for Short-Season Production

      Nelson, J. M.; Briggs, R. E.; Hart, G.; Silvertooth, Jeff; Bantlin, Marguerite (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1990)
      A field study was conducted at the Maricopa Agricultural Center to determine the influence of plant water stress on the effectiveness of defoliants and yield of short season cotton. Irrigation termination dates of 11, 18 and 24 August were used to achieve different levels of water stress at the time defoliants were applied (1 September). Irrigation termination dates had little effect on the response of cotton to defoliants. Def-6 at the lowest rate tested, 0.75 lbs a.i./A, was less effective in defoliating cotton with a 24 August irrigation termination date than cotton terminated earlier. Dropp resulted in higher defoliation percentages and 30% fewer unopened bolls at harvest than Def-6. Although the irrigation termination dates provided a range of CWSI values at the time of chemical termination, no clear relationship was found between CWSI values and defoliation percentages. Short season cotton (149 days) produced 3.2 bales of lint/A compared to 4.4 bales for a full-season crop (208 days).
    • Cotton Variety Trial, Mohave Valley, 1989

      Grumbles, R.; Malcuit, J.; Green, L.; Silvertooth, Jeff; Bantlin, Marguerite (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1990)
      Seven cotton varieties including Pima S -6 were demonstrated in Mohave Valley, Mohave County in 1989. Of the six upland varieties two were new varieties not previously demonstrated in this area. Trial results indicated DP77 at 1697 lbs. led other varieties by 109 lbs. of lint over DP90, 1590 lbs. and 287 lbs. over bottom variety STV115 at 1412 lbs. STV110 yielded 1482 lbs., DES 119 at 1429 lbs., DP50 at 1414 lbs. Pima S-6 yielded 950 lbs. The two new varieties STV110 and STV115 placed last and third on yield but when economic values were calculated based on grade and price they ranked third and fourth. The second attempt on Pima saw an increase in yield from 447 lbs., the previous year to 950 lbs. in current trial.
    • Gossyplure-baited Pink Bollworm Male Moth Trap Studies

      Chu, C. C.; Henneberry, T. J.; Silvertooth, Jeff; Bantlin, Marguerite (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1990)
      Gossyplure, the pink bollworm, Pectinophora gossvpiella (Saunders), sex pheromone is an excellent tool as a bait in traps for detection, survey, research and monitoring male moth populations. We studied the within - and between-seasonal changes of pink bollworm male moth catches in gossyplure-baited live traps installed in cotton fields each year from 1981 to 1988. Seasonal average number of male moths caught varied from 14/trap/night in 1982 to 148 /trap /night in 1981. Male moths caught/trap/night were highly correlated with the minimum air temperatures. The number of male moths caught from March to June were significantly correlated with those caught from July to August, indicating that early spring trapping can be used to identify potential problem fields.
    • Sweetpotato Whitefly Populations in Cotton Genotypes at Poston, Arizona in 1988

      Butler, G. D. Jr.; Henneberry, T. J.; Perkins, H. H. Jr.; Silvertooth, Jeff; Bantlin, Marguerite (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1990)
      Studies were conducted to identify potential sources of cotton germ plasm resistant to sweetpotato whitefly (SPW), Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius). Numbers of adult SPW sampled using black pan and vacuum methods showed reduced numbers of SPW on GC-EXP-7007 experimental variety vs. all other entries. However, numbers of SPW pupae on leaf samples in most cases were not different. Pima P-62 had the high numbers of SPW adults per blackpan sample, and highest number of pupae/leaf sample.
    • Effects of Date of Planting on the Yield of Four Cotton Varieties at Yuma, Arizona

      Malcuit, J. E.; Howell, D. R.; Silvertooth, J. C.; Silvertooth, Jeff; Bantlin, Marguerite (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1990)
      A field experiment was conducted in Yuma, Arizona, to evaluate the effects of planting date on cotton yields. One Pima and the Upland cotton varieties were planted on four dates from 23 February to 5 April. DPL-90 produced the highest yield (1760 lbs lint acre⁻¹) at the second planting date (9 March). The lowest yields, for all varieties, resulted from the latest planting date (5 April). The greatest reductions in yield when comparing an early planting date to the latest planting date, were observed for DPL-90 and Pima S-6. However, in spite of the reduction in yield, DPL-90 was the highest yielding variety at the latest planting date.
    • PIX Multiple Application Evaluations in Arizona on Upland and Pima Cotton, 1989

      Silvertooth, J. C.; Malcuit, J. E.; Howell, D. R.; Farr, C. R.; Silvertooth, Jeff; Bantlin, Marguerite (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1990)
    • Suppresion of Inflection of Cotton Seedlings by Rhizoetonia Solani in the Presence of Thielaviopsis Basicola, the Causal Agent of Black Root Rot

      Chapman, M. A.; Hine, R. B.; Silvertooth, Jeff; Bantlin, Marguerite (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1990)
      High population levels of Rhizoctonia solani in a field in Coolidge, AZ which also contained Thielaviopsis basicola failed to cause the expected infection by R. solani in untreated seeds of Gossypium hirsutum. Growth chamber experiments with autoclaved soil amended with inoculum of both R. solani, and T. basicola had a significantly lower infection rate by R. solani than did the control soil with R. solani alone.
    • Irrigation Scheduling on Long and Short Staple Cotton, Safford Agricultural Center, 1989

      Clark, L. J.; Carpenter, E. W.; Scherer, T.; Slack, D.; Fox, F.; Silvertooth, Jeff; Bantlin, Marguerite (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1990)
      Two irrigation scheduling trials were performed in 1989, one for short staple and one for long staple. Yields in the trials were very good with the best treatments yielding over 1700 and 1600 pounds of lint per acre for DP 90 and S-4 respectively. The treatment using Infrared thermometry was the best overall treatment in the short - staple trial, with the highest yield, the highest percent first pick, the shortest plants, the lowest water use and the highest water use efficiency. The two computer methods were very close to the IR treatment in yield and percent first pick, but grew taller plants with more water and were not as efficient with their water use. The trial on long staple cotton was encouraging in that reasonable yields were obtained using short-staple parameters. The computer model using AZMET data yielded significantly lower than the other treatments, indicating that we need to refine the evapotranspiration crop coefficients.
    • Sewage Sludge Effects on Soil Properties, Nitrogen Availability, and Yield at Marana, 1989

      Ottman, M. J.; Pepper, I. L.; Artiola, J. F.; Taylor, B. B.; Silvertooth, Jeff; Bantlin, Marguerite (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1990)
    • Insecticide Efficacy on Beet Armyworm Infestations in Open and Closed Cotton Flowers and Effects of Flower Infestation on Boll Abcission

      Akey, D. H.; Henneberry, T. J.; Silvertooth, Jeff; Bantlin, Marguerite (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1990)
      In 1988 severe beet armywonn (BAW) infestations resulted in damaged cotton flowers and foliage. Some insecticide applications failed to eliminate larvae in the flowers because applications were applied before the flowers opened. Applications made after flowers were open were more effective. In 1989, tests were conducted to define further these results. Karate™ applied when cotton flowers were open achieved 90% control compared to 9% when flowers were closed in one test, and 97% compared to 13 %, respectively, in a second test (P\0.01). A higher percentage (18 %) of cotton bolls was shed on day 7 following flower infestations than were shed (6 %) when flowers were not infested.
    • Short Staple Variety Demonstrations, Pinal County, 1989

      Malcuit, J.; Stedman, S.; Silvertooth, J.; Silvertooth, Jeff; Bantlin, Marguerite (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1990)
      Short staple variety demonstrations were conducted in Pinal County in 1989 at the Prechel and Benedict Farms near Coolidge Az. Twelve varieties were included in the demonstration at Prechel Farms. Results from the analysis showed significant differences among varieties. Seedcotton yields in this test ranged from 4826 to 2844 lbs. acre⁻¹ for STV BR-110 and S-55 respectively. Seven varieties were included in the demonstration at Benedict Farms. Results from the analysis showed significant differences among varieties. Seedcotton yields in this test ranged from 4127 to 3530 lbs. acre⁻¹ for STV BR-110 and DP-50 respectively.
    • Regional Variety Tests

      Pegelow, E. J. Jr.; McAlister, A. C.; Silvertooth, Jeff; Bantlin, Marguerite (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1990)
      Regional variety tests were conducted at Maricopa, and Marana Agricultural Centers in continuing cooperation with the beltwide testing program. The national standards included in this test were Coker 139, Deltapine 50, and Paymaster 145. Lint yields for each variety, at both locations, are given in Table 1.