• Cottonseed Treatment Evaluations in Arizona, 1989

      Silvertooth, J. C.; Malcuit, J. E.; Silvertooth, Jeff; Bantlin, Marguerite (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1990)
    • Effect of Harvest Date on Aflatoxin Contamination in the Yuma Valley

      Cotty, P. J.; Silvertooth, Jeff; Bantlin, Marguerite (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1990)
      Experiments were performed at the Yuma Valley Agricultural Center to determine how timely harvest of cotton may affect aflatoxin contamination of cottonseed As the cotton was held in the field between the final irrigation and harvest, the quantity of aflataxin in the crop increased. Significant reductions in aflatoxin contents of seed were realized by harvesting in early September.
    • The Effect on Yield of Cotton Due to Incidence and Severity of Black Root Rot Caused by Thielaviopsis Basicola

      Chapman, M. A.; Hine, R. B.; Silvertooth, Jeff; Bantlin, Marguerite (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1990)
      Incidence of Black Root Rot of cotton and soil inoculum potential of the causal agent Thielaviopsis basicola were monitored throughout the season in two adjacent fields planted in mid April, 1987 in Duncan, Arizona. Mean inoculum potential in Field 1 soil was 65 cfu/g and 20 % of the seedlings were infected. In Field 2 the inoculum potential and percentage of infected plants were 225 cfu/g and 93, respectively. No cortical decay was noted after June 6 in either field. Yields were similar in both fields.
    • Response of Texas Root Rot to a Soil Sterilant the Second Year After Application in Marana, 1989

      Thacker, G. W.; Silvertooth, J. C.; Silvertooth, Jeff; Bantlin, Marguerite (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1990)
      Two years after sterilizing a sandy loam soil in Marana, we measured significant yield responses of short staple cotton. The yield response was significant in the first year as well, but was not enough to pay the cost of sterilization. This second year of yield response made the treatment economically feasible.
    • Suppresion of Inflection of Cotton Seedlings by Rhizoetonia Solani in the Presence of Thielaviopsis Basicola, the Causal Agent of Black Root Rot

      Chapman, M. A.; Hine, R. B.; Silvertooth, Jeff; Bantlin, Marguerite (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1990)
      High population levels of Rhizoctonia solani in a field in Coolidge, AZ which also contained Thielaviopsis basicola failed to cause the expected infection by R. solani in untreated seeds of Gossypium hirsutum. Growth chamber experiments with autoclaved soil amended with inoculum of both R. solani, and T. basicola had a significantly lower infection rate by R. solani than did the control soil with R. solani alone.