• Regional Variety Tests

      Pegelow, E. J. Jr.; McAlister, A. C.; Silvertooth, Jeff; Bantlin, Marguerite (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1990)
      Regional variety tests were conducted at Maricopa, and Marana Agricultural Centers in continuing cooperation with the beltwide testing program. The national standards included in this test were Coker 139, Deltapine 50, and Paymaster 145. Lint yields for each variety, at both locations, are given in Table 1.
    • Response of Texas Root Rot to a Soil Sterilant the Second Year After Application in Marana, 1989

      Thacker, G. W.; Silvertooth, J. C.; Silvertooth, Jeff; Bantlin, Marguerite (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1990)
      Two years after sterilizing a sandy loam soil in Marana, we measured significant yield responses of short staple cotton. The yield response was significant in the first year as well, but was not enough to pay the cost of sterilization. This second year of yield response made the treatment economically feasible.
    • A Sensor System for Monitoring Cotton Water Status

      Fangmeier, D. D.; Husman, S. H.; Garrot, D. J. Jr.; Yitajew, M.; Silvertooth, Jeff; Bantlin, Marguerite (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1990)
    • Sewage Sludge Effects on Soil Properties, Nitrogen Availability, and Yield at Marana, 1989

      Ottman, M. J.; Pepper, I. L.; Artiola, J. F.; Taylor, B. B.; Silvertooth, Jeff; Bantlin, Marguerite (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1990)
    • Short and Long Staple Variety Trials, Greenlee County, 1989

      Clark, Lee. J.; Silvertooth, Jeff; Bantlin, Marguerite (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1990)
      Two short staple and one long staple variety trials were implemented in Greenlee County in 1989, with new varieties topping each trial. The most exciting new discovery was HS 46, which topped the competition in the short-staple trial by nearly 200 pounds of lint per acre. In the acala trial, the top four entries were composed of three New Mexico experimentals and Prema from the San Joaquin Valley. Any one of these acalas could become the new standard for the valley. P-69 in the long staple cotton trial yielded over 850 pounds of lint per acre and topped the S-6 yield by 25%. The testing program in Greenlee County is not only of benefit to the cotton producers and related agri-businesses in southeastern Arizona, but also to southwestern New Mexico.
    • Short Staple Demonstrations, Graham County, 1989

      Clark, Lee. J.; Cluff, Ronald E.; Silvertooth, Jeff; Bantlin, Marguerite (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1990)
      Short- staple variety trials were grown in two locations in Graham County in 1989. Exceptional weather conditions, coupled with good management practices, provided record cotton yields in the Safford valley. Delta Pine 77 was the highest yielding variety in the Thatcher location with a yield of 1740 pounds of lint per acre. An experimental acala from New Mexico came in second in this triad ahead of Delta Pine 90. Delta Pine 90 was the highest yielding variety in the Eden area with a yield of 1196 pounds per acre. Data on percent first pick plant height and plant populations are presented for each variety in each location. Graphs of heat units received each day throughout the growing season at the AZMET station on the Safford Agricultural Center are presented for 1988 and 1989.
    • Short Staple Variety Demonstration, Maricopa Agricultural Center, 1989

      Malcuit, J.; Silvertooth, J.; Silvertooth, Jeff; Bantlin, Marguerite (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1990)
      A short staple variety trial was conducted on the demonstration farm, at the Maricopa Agricultural Center in 1989. Twenty varieties, received from various seed companies, were entered into the test. Results from the analysis showed significant differences among varieties with no observable performance trend in terms of maturity types (long or short season). The lint yields in this test ranged from 4679 to 3353 lbs. acre⁻¹ for DPL90, and S55 respectively.
    • Short Staple Variety Demonstration, Yuma County, 1989

      Howell, D. R.; Silvertooth, J.; Malcuit, J.; Sharp, D.; Sharp, C.; Silvertooth, Jeff; Bantlin, Marguerite (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1990)
      The standard variety DPL 61 yielded higher in this trial. M-5, a California acala type was tested for the first time.
    • Short Staple Variety Demonstrations, Pinal County, 1989

      Malcuit, J.; Stedman, S.; Silvertooth, J.; Silvertooth, Jeff; Bantlin, Marguerite (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1990)
      Short staple variety demonstrations were conducted in Pinal County in 1989 at the Prechel and Benedict Farms near Coolidge Az. Twelve varieties were included in the demonstration at Prechel Farms. Results from the analysis showed significant differences among varieties. Seedcotton yields in this test ranged from 4826 to 2844 lbs. acre⁻¹ for STV BR-110 and S-55 respectively. Seven varieties were included in the demonstration at Benedict Farms. Results from the analysis showed significant differences among varieties. Seedcotton yields in this test ranged from 4127 to 3530 lbs. acre⁻¹ for STV BR-110 and DP-50 respectively.
    • Short Staple Variety Trial, Cochise County, 1989

      Clark, Lee J.; Schwennesen, Eric; Silvertooth, Jeff; Bantlin, Marguerite (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1990)
      The old standar4 1517-75, was the best yielding variety in 1989, yielding over three bales of lintper acre. 1517-77BR, which yielded well in 1987 and then dropped off a bit in 1988, carne in second and an experimental, 6658 came in third. The touted New Mexico star, 1517-88 came in fourth followed closely by California's Prema. Eight of the 10 varieties tested yielded over 2.5 bales per acre. More than normal heat units coupled with good management practices brought the highest yields yet recorded in a University cotton variety trial in Cochise County.
    • A Study of PIX Rates across CaZa and Triggrr on Long and Short Staple Cotton, Safford Agricultural Center, 1989

      Clark, L. J.; Carpenter, E. W.; Silvertooth, Jeff; Bantlin, Marguerite (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1990)
      An experiment was designed to test seven treatments of PIX on both short and long staple cotton. The treatments included single applications of 1/2- and 1-pint rates and multiple applications of 1/8- and 1/4-pint rates. Because of the exceptionally good growing season with lots of early heat units, both short- and long-staple plants set fruit early, which limited their vegetative growth naturally without the need for FIX. Yields were high with lint production over 1800 and 1400 pounds of lint for short and long staple, respectively. Plant mapping also was performed on each treatment.
    • Suppresion of Inflection of Cotton Seedlings by Rhizoetonia Solani in the Presence of Thielaviopsis Basicola, the Causal Agent of Black Root Rot

      Chapman, M. A.; Hine, R. B.; Silvertooth, Jeff; Bantlin, Marguerite (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1990)
      High population levels of Rhizoctonia solani in a field in Coolidge, AZ which also contained Thielaviopsis basicola failed to cause the expected infection by R. solani in untreated seeds of Gossypium hirsutum. Growth chamber experiments with autoclaved soil amended with inoculum of both R. solani, and T. basicola had a significantly lower infection rate by R. solani than did the control soil with R. solani alone.
    • Sweetpotato Whitefly Populations in Cotton Genotypes at Poston, Arizona in 1988

      Butler, G. D. Jr.; Henneberry, T. J.; Perkins, H. H. Jr.; Silvertooth, Jeff; Bantlin, Marguerite (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1990)
      Studies were conducted to identify potential sources of cotton germ plasm resistant to sweetpotato whitefly (SPW), Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius). Numbers of adult SPW sampled using black pan and vacuum methods showed reduced numbers of SPW on GC-EXP-7007 experimental variety vs. all other entries. However, numbers of SPW pupae on leaf samples in most cases were not different. Pima P-62 had the high numbers of SPW adults per blackpan sample, and highest number of pupae/leaf sample.
    • Upland and Pima Cotton Response to Banded Phophate Fertilization

      Silvertooth, J. C.; Malcuit, J. E.; Doerge, T. A.; Thacker, G. W.; Stedman, S. W.; Silvertooth, Jeff; Bantlin, Marguerite (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1990)
      Four field experiments were established in Arizona in 1988 and six in 1989 to evaluate the effects of banded phosphorus (P) fertilizer on cotton. Experiments each year involved both Upland (Gossvpium hirsutum L.) and American Pima (Q. barbadense L.). Banded applications of P fertilizer were made with placement of the concentrated band of fertilizer 6 in. below and 3 in. to the side of the zone of seed placement. Fertilizer sources of P₂O₅ were with 10-34-0 or 16-20-0. At all locations, a series of rates of applied P₂O₅ were established as the treatment variables, including a check (0 lb P₂O₅/acre). Rates of applied P ranged from 0 to 90 lb P₂O₅/acre, at increments of approximately 30 lb. P₂O₅/acre. In all cases, treatments in the field were arranged in a randomized complete block design with four replications. Plant measurements for plant height, flower numbers per unit area, number of mainstem nodes, and nodes to the first fndting branch were initiated by the fifth true leaf stage to evaluate plant response in terms of growth and development. Plant tissue samples were also taken at several stages of growth from each experiment throughout the growing season. Tissue samples consisted of petioles and leaf blades from the uppermost fully developed leaves. Petioles were analyzed for extractable PO₄-P and leaf blades for total P. Lint yield measurements also were taken. With the exception of one of the experimental locations in each year, no statistically significant differences (P≤0.05) were found among any treatments for any of the plant growth parameters. The same was true with regard to petiole PO₄-P and leaf blade total P levels measured. No significant differences among treatments were found for either Upland or Pima cotton with regard to lint yield in 1988 or 1989.