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dc.contributor.authorWelch, Robyn Kelly
dc.creatorWelch, Robyn Kellyen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-11-22T00:38:37Z
dc.date.available2011-11-22T00:38:37Z
dc.date.issued2004
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/190240
dc.description.abstractAlthough a wealth of research within the field of urban and regional economics focuses on intraurban variation in housing prices and rents, comparatively less research has been done on their variation at the interurban level – especially with respect to public services. This research attempts to fill this gap in the literature through the investigation of four questions: Do public service expenditures help to explain interurban variation in housing prices and rents? What types of spending make the most difference? How does their effect on housing values compare to their effect on rents? And do these effects change through time? Using an econometric analysis of housing prices and rents in a national data set of metropolitan counties, this research provides substantial evidence linking public goods and services to the place-to-place variations in the cost of living – suggesting that public policy may be used to directly influence the relative attractiveness of regions.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.titleThe Influence of Public Service Expenditures on Housing Values and Rents: An Interurban Approachen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePlanningen_US
thesis.degree.nameMSen_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-24T05:41:54Z
html.description.abstractAlthough a wealth of research within the field of urban and regional economics focuses on intraurban variation in housing prices and rents, comparatively less research has been done on their variation at the interurban level – especially with respect to public services. This research attempts to fill this gap in the literature through the investigation of four questions: Do public service expenditures help to explain interurban variation in housing prices and rents? What types of spending make the most difference? How does their effect on housing values compare to their effect on rents? And do these effects change through time? Using an econometric analysis of housing prices and rents in a national data set of metropolitan counties, this research provides substantial evidence linking public goods and services to the place-to-place variations in the cost of living – suggesting that public policy may be used to directly influence the relative attractiveness of regions.


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