• Agronomic Comparison of Transgenic Varieties with their Parent Lines, Safford Agricultural Center, 1998

      Clark, Lee J.; Carpenter, E. W.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999)
      As more transgenic varieties become available, grower=s interests intensify and more information is needed to satisfy the inquiries. Agronomic comparisons of six lines (transgenic varieties and their recurrent parents) from three companies are represented in this high desert study. Results show some subtle differences between the transgenic lines and their recurrent parents. Under the high Pink Bollworm pressure observed in the trial, yield increases were uniformly seen when the Bt gene was present, even though all plots were sprayed to control insect pests. Yields tended to be lower when herbicide resistence was introduced into the plants (even though not statistically significant), except when placed in a stacked array. Several agronomic values and HVI lint quality values are reported in this report.
    • Cotton Fertility Study, Safford Agricultural Center, 1998

      Clark, Lee J.; Carpenter, E. W.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999)
      Three different nitrogen fertilizer regimes were practiced in this study along with an unfertilized check. The same amount of nitrogen fertilizer was sidedressed in the plots in one, two or three applications. No significant differences were seen, but the trends looked like the split applications might have had some advantage.
    • Date of Planting by Long Staple and Short Staple Variety Trial, Safford Agricultural Center, 1998

      Clark, Lee J.; Carpenter, E. W.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999)
      Four varieties each of Long Staple and Short Staple cotton were tested over four dates of planting in this study. The first date of planting for the Long Staple cotton was delayed to the 3rd of April because of poor weather earlier. The latest planting was May 13th. Cultivars of differing maturities were tested for both long and short staple cotton to determine their optimal planting time. Many agronomic and hvi values were evaluated to determine the effect of different planting dates.
    • Defoliation of Pima Upland Cotton at the Safford Agricultural Center, 1998

      Clark, Lee J.; Carpenter, E. W.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999)
      Nine defoliation treatments were applied to Pima and upland cotton to compare the treatment effects on percent leaf drop, trash sent to the gin, lint yields, percent lint turnout and percent first pick. All of the treatments were beneficial to leaf drop compared to the untreated check with the Ginstar treatments generally performing better than the others. The addition of nonionic surfactants and drift retardants seemed to reduce the activity of Ginstar. Yield differences on long staple treatments were notices and discussed in the paper.
    • Pima Cotton Regional Variety Trial, Safford Agricultural Center, 1998

      Clark, Lee J.; Carpenter, E. W.; Hart, G. L.; Nelson, J. M.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999)
      Sixteen long staple varieties were tested in a replicated small plot trial on the Safford Agricultural Center in Graham county at an elevation of 2950 feet. The highest yielding variety in this study was OA 340 with a yield of 1021 pounds of lint per acre. It was followed by two other Olvey varieties yielding over 900 pounds per acre, including OA 322 and OA 361 (White Pima). In the adjacent regional short staple cotton trial were three interspecific hybrids from Hazera, an Israeli Seed Company. These hybrids grew like short staple cotton, but the fiber was more like the barbadense parent. These hybrids yielded from 1146 to 1091 pounds per acre. Their data is included at the bottom of the tables for comparison with the other long staple variety values. Yield and other agronomic data as well as fiber quality data are contained in this paper.
    • Pima Regional Variety Test at the Maricopa Agricultural Center, 1998

      Hart, G. L.; Nelson, J. M.; Clark, Lee J.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999)
      Seventeen Pima varieties were grown in a replicated trial at the Maricopa Agricultural Center as part of the national cotton variety testing program. Lint yield, boll size, lint percent, plant populations, plant heights and fiber properties are presented in this report.
    • Short Staple Regional Cotton Variety Trial, Safford Agricultural Center, 1998

      Clark, Lee J.; Carpenter, E. W.; Hart, G. L.; Nelson, J. M.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999)
      Forty eight short staple varieties were grown in a replicated field trial on the Safford Agricultural Center. Excellent yields were recorded, especially considering the late start caused by unseasonably cold weather in April. FM 989, the Australian variety formerly known as IF 1003, produced the highest lint yield of 1601 pounds per acre. Three other varieties, FM 975, AP 4103 and IF 1002, produced over 1500 pound of lint per acre. Agronomic values for the plants at harvest and HVI data for lint quality are tabulated in this paper.
    • Short Staple Variety Trial, Greenlee County, 1998

      Clark, Lee J.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999)
      Six short staple cotton varieties including two New Mexico acalas varieties and one advanced strain, an Australian varieties and two SureGrow varieties with higher yield potential were tested in this study. New Mexico Acala 1517-95 had the highest lint yield with a yield of 419 pounds of lint per acre. The average yield was about 400 pounds per acre lower than the 6 year average due to a cold spring and a four inch rain that fell in one hour in the middle of July. In addition to lint yields; percent lint, plant heights, plant populations and lint hvi values are shown. A lint yield comparison for 1993 through 1998 is included in this paper.
    • Short Staple Variety Trials in Cochise County, 1998

      Clark, Lee J.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999)
      Variety trials were grown at two locations and with two different sets of short staple varieties. One trial on the Robbs farm, north of Kansas Settlement, tested two acala varieties and the most promising advanced strain from New Mexico, two short seasoned varieties from SureGrow and one Australia variety. The other trial on the Glenn Schmidt farm, in Kansas Settlement, tested seventeen upland varieties as part of the statewide testing program. The highest yielding variety in the Robbs trial was SG 404 with SG 125 coming in second. In the Schmidt trial, FM 989, an Australian variety that has performed well in Safford, had the highest yield, just over 2 bales per acre.
    • Short Staple Variety Trials, Graham County, 1998

      Clark, Lee J.; Carpenter, E. W.; Walser, R. H.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999)
      Two replicated on-farm short staple variety trials were planted in 1998. Fifteen varieties were evaluated on both the Carpenter farm in Thatcher and the Colvin farm near Ft. Thomas. Several new varieties were planted in both studies, including 4 transgenic varieties: DP 90B, BXN 47, DP 90RR and Paymaster 1560BG, 2 varieties from Australia: FiberMax 989 and FiberMax 832, and seven other varieties seen for the first time. Two of the new varieties produced the highest yields; AgriPro 6101 and Phytogen 952 on the Carpenter and Colvin farms, respectively. Other agronomic data from the varieties and HVI values from the lint are also included in this report.
    • Upland Regional Cotton Variety Test at the Maricopa Agricultural Center, 1998

      Hart, G. L.; Nelson, J. M.; Clark, Lee J.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999)
      Thirty six upland cotton varieties were grown at the Maricopa Agricultural Center as part of the national cotton variety testing program. Lint yield, boll size, lint percent, plant populations, plant heights and fiber properties are presented in this paper.