• The 1999 Arizona Cotton Advisory Program

      Brown, P.; Russell, B.; Silvertooth, Jeffrey C.; Ellsworth, Peter C.; Olsen, Mary W.; Husman, Stephen H.; Walser, R.; Clark, L.; Dunn, D.; Schneider, M.; et al. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999)
      Arizona Cooperative Extension generates and distributes weather-based Planting Date and Cotton Development Advisories for 19 cotton production areas (Aguila, Buckeye, Cochise Co., Coolidge, Eloy, , Laveen, Litchfield Pk., Marana, Maricopa, Mohave Valley, Paloma, Parker, Pinal Co., Queen Creek, Roll, Safford and Yuma Valley). Planting Date Advisories are distributed from legal first planting date until the end of April and provide updates on heat-unit-based planting windows, recent and forecasted weather conditions, heat unit accumulations, variety selection, soil temperatures, recommended plant population, and early insect management and control. Cotton Development Advisories are distributed from early May through early September and provide updates on crop development, insects, weather and agronomy. The Cotton Advisory Program will continue in 1999, and growers may obtain advisories by mail/fax from local extension offices or by computer from the AZMET Internet Web Page (http://ag.arizona.edu/azmet). Major program changes planned for 1999 include 1) use of historical AZMET weather data for local normals and 2) elimination of the computer bulletin board as a computer-based means of retrieving the advisories.
    • Arizona Upland Cotton Variety Testing Program, 1998

      Silvertooth, Jeffrey C.; Norton, Randy; Clark, L.; Walser, R.; Husman, Stephen H.; Knowles, Tim; Moser, H.; Silvertooth, Jeff; University of Arizona Cooperative Extension (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999)
      Ten field experiments were conducted in major cotton growing areas of Arizona in 1998 for the purpose of evaluating Upland cotton varieties in terms of adaptability and performance. Eight commercial cottonseed companies participated in the program. A maximum of two varieties were submitted by each company at each location. Experiments were conducted on a commercial level on grower-cooperator fields in most cases. Locations used in the program spanned the range of conditions common to cotton producing areas of the state from about 100 ft. to 4,000 ft. elevation. Each of the participating seed companies offer a compliment of varieties that can serve to match various production strategies commonly employed in the state. The 1998 cotton season was a very difficult one for many cotton producing areas in AZ below ~2,000 ft. elevation, characterized by a cool wet spring, late planting, a delayed crop, and a strong monsoon season that reduced fruit retention in many cases. Many varieties commercially available performed well at several locations demonstrating good adaptation to Arizona conditions.
    • Upland Cotton Lint Yield Response to Several Soil Moisture Depletion Levels

      Husman, Stephen H.; Johnson, K.; Wegener, R.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999)
      Upland cotton lint yield response to several soil moisture depletion levels was measured in 1997 and 1998. In 1997, four Upland cotton varieties including DP 5415, DP 33B, DP 5816, and STV 474 were tested. However because of a nonsignificant variety difference in the 1997 test, the 1998 test was planted to a single variety (DP 33B). In 1997 and 1998, depletion of plant available soil water (PAW) irrigation treatments consisted of 35%, 50%, 65%, and 80%. In 1997, all PAW depletion treatments were significantly different with the 35% PAW treatment resulting in the highest average lint yield of 1880 lbs. lint/acre. The 50%, 65%, and 80% PAW treatments resulted in 1410, 1123, and 248 lbs. lint/acre respectively. There was no significant (P<0.05) difference between varieties within all PAW treatments in 1997. In 1998, all PAW depletion treatments again were significantly different with the 35% PAW treatment resulting in the highest average lint yield of 1658 lbs. lint/acre. The 50%, 65%, and 80% PAW treatments resulted in 1534, 1396, and 641 lbs. lint/acre respectively.