• 1998 Cottonseed Variety and Fungicide Evaluation

      Knowles, Tim C.; Odom, Bruce; Wakimoto, Del, 1947-; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999)
      Two upland cotton varieties (Deltapine 5415 and SureGrow 125) were subjected to various seed fungicide treatments to determine seedling emergence and vigor in a Mohave Valley field prone to Rhizoctonia infection of cotton seedlings. During 1998, cotton seedlings in this field exhibited symptoms associated with Rhizoctonia, Pythium, and Thielaviopsis fungi. Of the treatments examined in this study, Baytan+Thiram+Allegiance or Baytan+Ascend+Allegiance cotton seed treatments provided superior seedling disease protection. The Protégé+Allegiance fungicide treatment provided superior seedling disease protection when applied to Deltapine 5415 cotton seed, however seedling disease suppression was poor when the same treatment was applied to SureGrow 125. The Vitavax-PCNB+Allegiance and NuFlow M+Maxim+Apron were the least effective fungicide seed treatments examined in this study.
    • Integrated Morningglory Control Strategies: Transgenic Cotton and Precision Cultivation

      Knowles, Tim C.; McCloskey, Bill; Wakimoto, Vic; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999)
      A field demonstration was conducted in Mohave Valley to compare cotton morningglory control programs that combined the use of over the top herbicides Roundup Ultra on Roundup Ready cotton (Deltapine 436 RR) or Staple on non-transgenic cotton (SureGrow 125) with and without precision cultivation.
    • Late Season Nitrogen Fertilizer for Cotton

      Knowles, Tim C.; Watson, Jack; Wakimoto, Vic; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999)
      Field experiments were conducted during the 1996 and 1997 growing seasons in Mohave Valley to determine the effect of late season nitrogen (N) fertilizer applications on top crop yield potential of upland cotton. A long season production system utilizing late season nitrogen (N) applications through peak bloom (August) was compared to a short season production system in which N was applied through mid-bloom (June). Mid-season N applications were based on UA guidelines utilizing plant mapping and petiole nitrate data for the short season production system.
    • Late Season Pink Bollworm Pressure in the Top Crop of Bt and Non-Bt Cotton

      Knowles, Tim C.; Dennehy, Tim J.; Rovey, Albert; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999)
      Green bolls (100/field) were sampled from the uppermost internodes within adjacent fields of Bt (Deltapine 33B) and non-Bt refuge (Hyperformer HS 44 or Deltapine 20) experiencing severe pink bollworm pressure late in the growing season. Evidence of 3rd instar or larger pink bollworm larvae survival was higher in susceptible bolls sampled from transgenic Bt cotton late in the 1998 growing season, compared to that observed late in the 1997 growing season.
    • Narrow Row Cotton Production in Vicksberg

      Knowles, Tim C.; Cramer, Roc; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999)
      Deltapine 458B/RR, Deltapine 5415RR, Deltapine 20B, and Deltapine 20 cotton varieties were planted on June 5 into narrow 15 inch wide rows. Populations ranged from 80,000 to 100,000 plants per acre. Seed cotton was stripper harvested on December 17. Although lint yields were somewhat low (1- 2 bale/acre) for this late planted cotton, we learned several important practices for effective narrow row cotton production systems, based on our first years experience in western Arizona.
    • Preplant Micronutrient Fertilizers for Cotton

      Knowles, Tim C.; Artz, Paul; Sherrill, Chip; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999)
      Micronutrient fertilizers including zinc, boron, copper, and manganese in their sulfate forms were broadcast applied and incorporated preplant to determine their effects on lint yield of upland cotton.
    • Systemic Insecticide Applications at Planting for Early Season Thrips Control

      Knowles, Tim C.; Bushong, Neil; Lloyd, Jim; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999)
      Temik 15G (6 lbs/acre) or Thimet 20G (8.2 lbs/acre) granular insecticides were applied to 40 inch rows in furrow at planting to cotton growing in Parker Valley, AZ. Moderate thrips pressure (0.5-1.5 thrips/plant) was experienced for the first eight weeks after planting and granular insecticide application. Temik provided better thrips control than Thimet for the first seven weeks after planting this study. Thrips control was similar for the two insecticides beyond eight weeks after planting. Temik application resulted in higher fruit retention levels measured up to 10 weeks after planting, compared to Thimet. However, fruit retention levels measured from 12 to 16 weeks after planting were similar for both Temik and Thimet when cotton plants compensated for early season square losses caused by thrips feeding.