• Defoliation of Pima Upland Cotton at the Safford Agricultural Center, 1998

      Clark, Lee J.; Carpenter, E. W.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999)
      Nine defoliation treatments were applied to Pima and upland cotton to compare the treatment effects on percent leaf drop, trash sent to the gin, lint yields, percent lint turnout and percent first pick. All of the treatments were beneficial to leaf drop compared to the untreated check with the Ginstar treatments generally performing better than the others. The addition of nonionic surfactants and drift retardants seemed to reduce the activity of Ginstar. Yield differences on long staple treatments were notices and discussed in the paper.
    • Narrow Row Cotton Production in Vicksberg

      Knowles, Tim C.; Cramer, Roc; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999)
      Deltapine 458B/RR, Deltapine 5415RR, Deltapine 20B, and Deltapine 20 cotton varieties were planted on June 5 into narrow 15 inch wide rows. Populations ranged from 80,000 to 100,000 plants per acre. Seed cotton was stripper harvested on December 17. Although lint yields were somewhat low (1- 2 bale/acre) for this late planted cotton, we learned several important practices for effective narrow row cotton production systems, based on our first years experience in western Arizona.
    • Short Staple Variety Trials, Graham County, 1998

      Clark, Lee J.; Carpenter, E. W.; Walser, R. H.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999)
      Two replicated on-farm short staple variety trials were planted in 1998. Fifteen varieties were evaluated on both the Carpenter farm in Thatcher and the Colvin farm near Ft. Thomas. Several new varieties were planted in both studies, including 4 transgenic varieties: DP 90B, BXN 47, DP 90RR and Paymaster 1560BG, 2 varieties from Australia: FiberMax 989 and FiberMax 832, and seven other varieties seen for the first time. Two of the new varieties produced the highest yields; AgriPro 6101 and Phytogen 952 on the Carpenter and Colvin farms, respectively. Other agronomic data from the varieties and HVI values from the lint are also included in this report.
    • 1998 Low Desert Upland Cotton Advanced Strains Testing Program

      Husman, Stephen J.; Wegener, R.; Johnson, K.; Silvertooth, Jeff; University of Arizona Cooperative Extension (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999)
      Upland cotton advanced strains and commercial check comparison varieties were evaluated in replicated field studies at three locations in 1998. The test sites include Buckeye, Az., Maricopa, Az., and Safford, AZ. Twelve seed companies submitted a maximum of five advanced strains entries per location. Three commercial check varieties were used at each site for comparison purposes and included DPL 5415, SG 125, and STV 474.
    • Preplant Micronutrient Fertilizers for Cotton

      Knowles, Tim C.; Artz, Paul; Sherrill, Chip; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999)
      Micronutrient fertilizers including zinc, boron, copper, and manganese in their sulfate forms were broadcast applied and incorporated preplant to determine their effects on lint yield of upland cotton.
    • Late Season Pink Bollworm Pressure in the Top Crop of Bt and Non-Bt Cotton

      Knowles, Tim C.; Dennehy, Tim J.; Rovey, Albert; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999)
      Green bolls (100/field) were sampled from the uppermost internodes within adjacent fields of Bt (Deltapine 33B) and non-Bt refuge (Hyperformer HS 44 or Deltapine 20) experiencing severe pink bollworm pressure late in the growing season. Evidence of 3rd instar or larger pink bollworm larvae survival was higher in susceptible bolls sampled from transgenic Bt cotton late in the 1998 growing season, compared to that observed late in the 1997 growing season.
    • Evaluation of a Feedback Approach to Nitrogen and Pix Applications, 1998

      Norton, E. J.; Silvertooth, Jeffrey C.; Norton, Eric R.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999)
      A single field experiment was conducted in 1998 at Marana, AZ to evaluate a scheduled (based upon stage of growth) versus a feedback approach (based upon growth parameters and crop conditions) to nitrogen (N) and mepiquat chloride (PixTM) applications on upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.). The parameters used in evaluating feedback applications for both N and Pix included fruit retention (FR) levels and height to node ratios (HNRs) with respect to established baselines for cotton grown in the desert Southwest. Scheduled and feedback Pix applications were made for a total of 1.5 and 2.5 pint Pix/acre, respectively, with the feedback treatments receiving a late season application at approximately 3100 heat units after planting (HUAP 86/550 F threshold). Scheduled Pix treatments received a single 1.5 pint Pix/acre application prior to peak bloom (approximately 2000 HUAP). Scheduled applications of fertilizer N totaled 205 lbs. N/acre from three applications. Feedback applications of N received a total of 100 lbs. N/acre from two applications. Treatments consisted of all combinations of feedback and scheduled applications of both N and Pix. The highest lint yields occurred in the treatment consisting of Pix feedback and N feedback (treatment two), however, there were no significant differences (P≥0.05) among any of the treatments with respect to yield.
    • Development of a Yield Projection Technique for Arizona Cotton

      Norton, Eric R.; Silvertooth, Jeffrey C.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999)
      A series of boll measurements were taken at numerous locations in cotton producing areas across Arizona in 1998 in an attempt to continue to develop a yield prediction model with a project that began in 1993. Results from 1995 showed the strongest relationship between final open boll counts and yield compared to a number of other measurements. Based on these results, data collection on boll counts began in 1996 and has continued in 1997 and 1998. Boll counts were taken as the number of harvestable bolls meter-1. All boll count measurements were made within one week of harvest. Number of bolls per unit area were then correlated to lint yield and an estimate for the number of bolls per area needed to produce a bale of lint was calculated. Estimates using all three years data combined indicate that approximately 38 bolls meter-1 are needed to produce one bale of lint per acre.
    • Short Staple Variety Trial, Greenlee County, 1998

      Clark, Lee J.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999)
      Six short staple cotton varieties including two New Mexico acalas varieties and one advanced strain, an Australian varieties and two SureGrow varieties with higher yield potential were tested in this study. New Mexico Acala 1517-95 had the highest lint yield with a yield of 419 pounds of lint per acre. The average yield was about 400 pounds per acre lower than the 6 year average due to a cold spring and a four inch rain that fell in one hour in the middle of July. In addition to lint yields; percent lint, plant heights, plant populations and lint hvi values are shown. A lint yield comparison for 1993 through 1998 is included in this paper.
    • Cotton Defoliation Evaluations, 1998

      Silvertooth, Jeffrey C.; Norton, Eric R.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999)
      A field experiment was conducted near Marana, AZ in 1998 to evaluate the effectiveness of a number of defoliation treatments on Upland (var. Stoneville 474) cotton.. All treatments consisted of materials commercially available in Arizona. Results reinforce general recommendations regarding the use of low rates (relative to the label ranges) under warm weather conditions and increasing rates as temperatures cool. Defoliation treatments of Ginstar alone did a satisfactory job of defoliation and regrowth/topgrowth contol and were very similar to Dropp + Def combination treatments. Adding Prep to Ginstar in this experiment did not improve defoliation or topgrowth control.
    • Cotton Fertility Study, Safford Agricultural Center, 1998

      Clark, Lee J.; Carpenter, E. W.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999)
      Three different nitrogen fertilizer regimes were practiced in this study along with an unfertilized check. The same amount of nitrogen fertilizer was sidedressed in the plots in one, two or three applications. No significant differences were seen, but the trends looked like the split applications might have had some advantage.
    • Fertility Management and Calibration Evaluations on Upland and Pima Cotton

      Thelander, A. S.; Silvertooth, Jeffrey C.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999)
      Various field experiments were conducted during the 1997 and 1998 cotton season involving macro and micronutrient fertilization. A total of six experiments were conducted at various locations in Arizona. Each of the field experiments studied the effects of different nutrients and nutrient combinations on both Upland and Pima varieties. The purpose of these experiments were to evaluate University of Arizona fertility guidelines with respect to soil test results and to possibly fine-tune or calibrate these guidelines for common Arizona soils and cotton growing regimes. Results from these experiments based on soil test information, quantitative plant measurements, and lint yield showed no significant difference due to treatments for all the studies except for a phosphorus study conducted in Graham County.
    • Short Staple Variety Trials in Cochise County, 1998

      Clark, Lee J.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999)
      Variety trials were grown at two locations and with two different sets of short staple varieties. One trial on the Robbs farm, north of Kansas Settlement, tested two acala varieties and the most promising advanced strain from New Mexico, two short seasoned varieties from SureGrow and one Australia variety. The other trial on the Glenn Schmidt farm, in Kansas Settlement, tested seventeen upland varieties as part of the statewide testing program. The highest yielding variety in the Robbs trial was SG 404 with SG 125 coming in second. In the Schmidt trial, FM 989, an Australian variety that has performed well in Safford, had the highest yield, just over 2 bales per acre.
    • Pima Regional Variety Test at the Maricopa Agricultural Center, 1998

      Hart, G. L.; Nelson, J. M.; Clark, Lee J.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999)
      Seventeen Pima varieties were grown in a replicated trial at the Maricopa Agricultural Center as part of the national cotton variety testing program. Lint yield, boll size, lint percent, plant populations, plant heights and fiber properties are presented in this report.
    • Evaluation of an Acid Soil Conditioner in an Irrigated Cotton Production System

      Griffin, J. R.; Silvertooth, Jeffrey C.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999)
      A single field study was conducted on a sodium-affected soil at the University of Arizona’s Maricopa Agricultural Center (MAC) in 1998. NuCotn 33B was dry planted and watered-up on 5 May 1998. Two treatments were evaluated; treatment 1 received no acid and treatment 2 received water-run acid applications. The acid used in this evaluation was sulfuric acid (H₂SO₄). The acid was applied at approximately 11 gallons acid/acre at each scheduled irrigation throughout the entire growing season. All other agronomic inputs and decisions were uniformly applied to both treatments in the same manner throughout the season. The experiment was arranged in a randomized complete block design with two treatments and six replications. Significant differences were found among the two treatments in terms of plant growth and soil water content (P<0.05). Lint yields were significantly different (P=0.0013) with the check having the highest yield.
    • EUP Evaluation of a Novel Insecticide for Lygus Control

      Ellsworth, Peter C.; Deeter, Brian; Whitlow, Mike; Silvertooth, Jeff; The University of Arizona, Department of Entomology & Maricopa Agricultural Center; Rhône-Poulenc Company, Fresno, CA; Arizona Cotton Research & Protection Council (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999)
      Lygus became the number one pest of cotton in 1998 with statewide losses of over $16 million in spite of individual costs to the grower of over $55/A for control. Selective technologies for whitefly and pink bollworm control reduce the number of broad spectrum sprays that incidentally control Lygus. Control of Lygus depends mainly on just two related chemical classes of insecticides, organophosphates and carbamates. Over reliance on such a limited diversity of chemical controls increases the risk of resistance. Further, FQPA threatens the future availability of many of our main stay chemical controls. The study reported here sought to investigate the commercial suitability of a new compound, Regent®, for the control of Lygus. This novel mode of action represents one of the few potential new tools under development for Lygus management. Under a federal Emergency Use Permit (EUP), Regent was tested against two standards of Lygus control (Orthene® and Vydate®) and an untreated check. In a test of unusually high Lygus densities, Regent provided excellent control of small (instars 1–3) and large (instars 4–5) Lygus nymphs and may provide marginally better control of adults than current standards. None of the tested agents provided quick control or knockdown of adults. Rather, adult levels were reduced over time, most likely as a result of prevention of the development of new adults via nymphal control. All three materials protected cotton producing yields significantly higher than the check. The Orthene treatment had the highest yield, though not significantly higher than the Regent treatment which was effectively sprayed one less time than the other compounds.
    • Evaluation of a Foliar Applied Seed Bed Calcium Soil Conditioner in in Irrigated Cotton Production System

      Griffin, J. R.; Silvertooth, Jeffrey C.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999)
      A multi-site experiment was conducted at Paloma Ranch, west of Gila Bend in Maricopa County and at Wellton in Yuma County Arizona. NuCotn 33B was dry planted and watered-up on 28 April 1998. Various rates of application of nitrogen (N) and calcium (Ca) from CN-9 [9-0-0-11Ca (5Ca(NO₃)₂•NH₄NO₃•10H₂O)] was used to evaluate the check. The CN-9 was applied as a foliar application directly to the seed bed on 27 April 1998. Treatment 1 was the check plot that received no CN-9. Treatment 2 received a 12 gal./acre application of CN-9 while treatment 3 received a 15 gal./acre application of CN-9. Each gal of CN-9 weighs approx. 12.2 lbs. and contains 1.1 lbs. of N and 1.4 lbs. of Ca. Treatment 2 received a total of 13 N/acre while treatment 3 received a total of 17 N/acre via CN-9. Treatment 1 received only farm standard applications of UAN-32. Treatments 2 and 3 each received farm standard applications of UAN-32 after the application of CN-9 for continued crop N needs. A total of 17 lbs./acre of Ca was applied to treatment 2 and 21 lbs./acre of Ca was applied to treatment 3. No significant differences were found among the various treatments in terms of plant growth, soil water content, ECₑ values, and sodium absorption ratios. Lint yields were not significantly different (P<0.05).
    • Systemic Insecticide Applications at Planting for Early Season Thrips Control

      Knowles, Tim C.; Bushong, Neil; Lloyd, Jim; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999)
      Temik 15G (6 lbs/acre) or Thimet 20G (8.2 lbs/acre) granular insecticides were applied to 40 inch rows in furrow at planting to cotton growing in Parker Valley, AZ. Moderate thrips pressure (0.5-1.5 thrips/plant) was experienced for the first eight weeks after planting and granular insecticide application. Temik provided better thrips control than Thimet for the first seven weeks after planting this study. Thrips control was similar for the two insecticides beyond eight weeks after planting. Temik application resulted in higher fruit retention levels measured up to 10 weeks after planting, compared to Thimet. However, fruit retention levels measured from 12 to 16 weeks after planting were similar for both Temik and Thimet when cotton plants compensated for early season square losses caused by thrips feeding.
    • Integrated Morningglory Control Strategies: Transgenic Cotton and Precision Cultivation

      Knowles, Tim C.; McCloskey, Bill; Wakimoto, Vic; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999)
      A field demonstration was conducted in Mohave Valley to compare cotton morningglory control programs that combined the use of over the top herbicides Roundup Ultra on Roundup Ready cotton (Deltapine 436 RR) or Staple on non-transgenic cotton (SureGrow 125) with and without precision cultivation.
    • Open Cotton Boll Exposure to Whiteflies and Development of Sticky Cotton

      Henneberry, Tom J.; Forlow Jech, L.; Hendrix, D. L.; Brushwood, D.; Steele, T.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999)
      Trehalulose and melezitose produced by Bemisia argentifolii Bellows and Perring and thermodetector counts in cotton lint increased with increasing numbers of days of exposure of open cotton bolls in infested cotton plots. Thermodetector counts were significantly correlated to amounts of trehalulose and melezitose. Rainfall of 0.5 inch reduced trehalulose and melezitose in cotton lint within 5 h following the rain. The results suggest dissolution of the sugars followed by runoff as opposed to microbial degradation.