• 1998 Low Desert Upland Cotton Advanced Strains Testing Program

      Husman, Stephen J.; Wegener, R.; Johnson, K.; Silvertooth, Jeff; University of Arizona Cooperative Extension (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999)
      Upland cotton advanced strains and commercial check comparison varieties were evaluated in replicated field studies at three locations in 1998. The test sites include Buckeye, Az., Maricopa, Az., and Safford, AZ. Twelve seed companies submitted a maximum of five advanced strains entries per location. Three commercial check varieties were used at each site for comparison purposes and included DPL 5415, SG 125, and STV 474.
    • Agronomic Comparison of Transgenic Varieties with their Parent Lines, Safford Agricultural Center, 1998

      Clark, Lee J.; Carpenter, E. W.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999)
      As more transgenic varieties become available, grower=s interests intensify and more information is needed to satisfy the inquiries. Agronomic comparisons of six lines (transgenic varieties and their recurrent parents) from three companies are represented in this high desert study. Results show some subtle differences between the transgenic lines and their recurrent parents. Under the high Pink Bollworm pressure observed in the trial, yield increases were uniformly seen when the Bt gene was present, even though all plots were sprayed to control insect pests. Yields tended to be lower when herbicide resistence was introduced into the plants (even though not statistically significant), except when placed in a stacked array. Several agronomic values and HVI lint quality values are reported in this report.
    • Agronomic Evaluations of Transgenic Cotton Varieties, 1998

      Silvertooth, Jeffrey C.; Norton, Eric R.; Silvertooth, Jeff; University of Arizona (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999)
      Several field experiments were conducted in many of the cotton growing areas of Arizona in 1998 for the purpose of evaluating agronomic characteristics of many new transgenic Upland cotton varieties. In many cases, the new transgenic lines were compared directly with their recurrent (nontransgenic) parents. Evaluations were carried out by collecting plant mapping data from each variety on a regular 14 day interval throughout the season and relating the resultant information to established baselines for Upland cotton in Arizona. Lint yield measurements were also taken on each variety at all locations. Results indicate that all transgenic lines tested are very similar to their recurrent parents in terms of growth, development, and yield. Some subtle differences were noted but they were very slight and should not impact management of the varieties significantly in comparison to their recurrent parents.
    • Arizona Upland Cotton Variety Testing Program, 1998

      Silvertooth, Jeffrey C.; Norton, Randy; Clark, L.; Walser, R.; Husman, Stephen H.; Knowles, Tim; Moser, H.; Silvertooth, Jeff; University of Arizona Cooperative Extension (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999)
      Ten field experiments were conducted in major cotton growing areas of Arizona in 1998 for the purpose of evaluating Upland cotton varieties in terms of adaptability and performance. Eight commercial cottonseed companies participated in the program. A maximum of two varieties were submitted by each company at each location. Experiments were conducted on a commercial level on grower-cooperator fields in most cases. Locations used in the program spanned the range of conditions common to cotton producing areas of the state from about 100 ft. to 4,000 ft. elevation. Each of the participating seed companies offer a compliment of varieties that can serve to match various production strategies commonly employed in the state. The 1998 cotton season was a very difficult one for many cotton producing areas in AZ below ~2,000 ft. elevation, characterized by a cool wet spring, late planting, a delayed crop, and a strong monsoon season that reduced fruit retention in many cases. Many varieties commercially available performed well at several locations demonstrating good adaptation to Arizona conditions.
    • Short Staple Regional Cotton Variety Trial, Safford Agricultural Center, 1998

      Clark, Lee J.; Carpenter, E. W.; Hart, G. L.; Nelson, J. M.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999)
      Forty eight short staple varieties were grown in a replicated field trial on the Safford Agricultural Center. Excellent yields were recorded, especially considering the late start caused by unseasonably cold weather in April. FM 989, the Australian variety formerly known as IF 1003, produced the highest lint yield of 1601 pounds per acre. Three other varieties, FM 975, AP 4103 and IF 1002, produced over 1500 pound of lint per acre. Agronomic values for the plants at harvest and HVI data for lint quality are tabulated in this paper.
    • Short Staple Variety Trial, Greenlee County, 1998

      Clark, Lee J.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999)
      Six short staple cotton varieties including two New Mexico acalas varieties and one advanced strain, an Australian varieties and two SureGrow varieties with higher yield potential were tested in this study. New Mexico Acala 1517-95 had the highest lint yield with a yield of 419 pounds of lint per acre. The average yield was about 400 pounds per acre lower than the 6 year average due to a cold spring and a four inch rain that fell in one hour in the middle of July. In addition to lint yields; percent lint, plant heights, plant populations and lint hvi values are shown. A lint yield comparison for 1993 through 1998 is included in this paper.
    • Short Staple Variety Trials in Cochise County, 1998

      Clark, Lee J.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999)
      Variety trials were grown at two locations and with two different sets of short staple varieties. One trial on the Robbs farm, north of Kansas Settlement, tested two acala varieties and the most promising advanced strain from New Mexico, two short seasoned varieties from SureGrow and one Australia variety. The other trial on the Glenn Schmidt farm, in Kansas Settlement, tested seventeen upland varieties as part of the statewide testing program. The highest yielding variety in the Robbs trial was SG 404 with SG 125 coming in second. In the Schmidt trial, FM 989, an Australian variety that has performed well in Safford, had the highest yield, just over 2 bales per acre.
    • Short Staple Variety Trials, Graham County, 1998

      Clark, Lee J.; Carpenter, E. W.; Walser, R. H.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999)
      Two replicated on-farm short staple variety trials were planted in 1998. Fifteen varieties were evaluated on both the Carpenter farm in Thatcher and the Colvin farm near Ft. Thomas. Several new varieties were planted in both studies, including 4 transgenic varieties: DP 90B, BXN 47, DP 90RR and Paymaster 1560BG, 2 varieties from Australia: FiberMax 989 and FiberMax 832, and seven other varieties seen for the first time. Two of the new varieties produced the highest yields; AgriPro 6101 and Phytogen 952 on the Carpenter and Colvin farms, respectively. Other agronomic data from the varieties and HVI values from the lint are also included in this report.
    • Upland Regional Cotton Variety Test at the Maricopa Agricultural Center, 1998

      Hart, G. L.; Nelson, J. M.; Clark, Lee J.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999)
      Thirty six upland cotton varieties were grown at the Maricopa Agricultural Center as part of the national cotton variety testing program. Lint yield, boll size, lint percent, plant populations, plant heights and fiber properties are presented in this paper.