Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorPatil, Uttara R.*
dc.creatorPatil, Uttara R.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-11-23T22:12:30Z
dc.date.available2011-11-23T22:12:30Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/190671
dc.description.abstractThis master's report describes a method for thermal comfort assessment of green roofs in the urban environment of hot arid regions. The dual goal of this study is to not only emphasize green roof technology but also to promote outdoor living by demonstrating techniques that achieve thermally comfortable microclimate. Methods of investigation for this project started with an experiment, which included building a physical model of 4'x4'x4' with three different roof types; asphalt shingle, corrugated metal and saturated/dry green roof. This model was then used to record the four environmental variables that were used to help predict thermal comfort. These are: Surface Temperature, Dry bulb Temperature, Globe Temperature, and Relative Humidity. Average air velocity was used. The premise behind conducting this experiment was to validate the superior performance of green roof over other roof types in a hot arid surrounding. Additionally, the gathered data was used for comparison with results derived from OUTDOOR© a computer program for the assessment of outdoor thermal comfort conditions. The project applied to a proposed green roof top at the College of Architecture and Landscape Architecture in Tucson, Arizona. Distinct locations were chosen on the proposed roof for performing thermal comfort analysis. Fish eye lens photography slogn with other data acquisition systems were used to simulate the conditions at the determined locations using the OUTDOOR© program. Results derived from this simulation were found to be conforming to original results from the experiment. The earlier evaluation brought forth the highly uncomfortable thermal conditions existing on the roof. Design strategies were suggested to counteract the existing situation and to bring temperatures within comfort zone. The final results indicate that simple but informed modifications to design can help provide desired outdoor thermal comfort levels even during the extreme climate found in the months of June and December.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.titleThermal Comfort Assessment of the Proposed Green Roof for the College of Architecture and Landscape Architecture, Tucson, Arizonaen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberChalfoun, Naderen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAlbanese, Charlesen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberStoltz, Ronalden_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineArchitectureen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-19T12:26:17Z
html.description.abstractThis master's report describes a method for thermal comfort assessment of green roofs in the urban environment of hot arid regions. The dual goal of this study is to not only emphasize green roof technology but also to promote outdoor living by demonstrating techniques that achieve thermally comfortable microclimate. Methods of investigation for this project started with an experiment, which included building a physical model of 4'x4'x4' with three different roof types; asphalt shingle, corrugated metal and saturated/dry green roof. This model was then used to record the four environmental variables that were used to help predict thermal comfort. These are: Surface Temperature, Dry bulb Temperature, Globe Temperature, and Relative Humidity. Average air velocity was used. The premise behind conducting this experiment was to validate the superior performance of green roof over other roof types in a hot arid surrounding. Additionally, the gathered data was used for comparison with results derived from OUTDOOR© a computer program for the assessment of outdoor thermal comfort conditions. The project applied to a proposed green roof top at the College of Architecture and Landscape Architecture in Tucson, Arizona. Distinct locations were chosen on the proposed roof for performing thermal comfort analysis. Fish eye lens photography slogn with other data acquisition systems were used to simulate the conditions at the determined locations using the OUTDOOR© program. Results derived from this simulation were found to be conforming to original results from the experiment. The earlier evaluation brought forth the highly uncomfortable thermal conditions existing on the roof. Design strategies were suggested to counteract the existing situation and to bring temperatures within comfort zone. The final results indicate that simple but informed modifications to design can help provide desired outdoor thermal comfort levels even during the extreme climate found in the months of June and December.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
azu_etd_mr0089_sip1_m.pdf
Size:
36.98Mb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record