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dc.contributor.authorBoubeka, Jacques.
dc.creatorBoubeka, Jacques.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-11-28T13:51:06Z
dc.date.available2011-11-28T13:51:06Z
dc.date.issued1996en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/191328
dc.description.abstractAdequate Water Resources Administration in Congo is a major concern for its government and its people. Water resources administration is a dilemma for government throughout the world, and Congo is no exception. An assessment of water resources administration practices in Congo today reveals several inadequacies attributable to deficiencies in the framework for decision making in the use and allocation of water resources. Actually, the entire field of water resources administration is dominated by one level the national government. In Congo, there is no water law to guide water development. It is known today that the administration of water resources in Congo is notorious for its inability to provide for the public welfare, partly because the structure of decision making is not conducive to an accurate definition of the public interest. There are no specific water organizations at the local level to represent water users and provide the delivery of essential water services, whereas this is the area which is critical to the enhancement of economic and public welfare. The institutional problem in water resources administration in Congo may be helped by adopting one of the three models proposed in this thesis. The first model will be the alternative of organizing water institutions by level of government. The second alternative will organize water institutions on the basis of resource geometry. While the third will be a mixed institutional model between the two systems above. If these models are adopted, successful social and economic development.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshWater resources development -- Models -- Congo.en_US
dc.titleAn institutional model of water resources administration in Congoen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.contributor.chairInce, Simonen_US
dc.identifier.oclc222028884en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBuras, N.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBradley, M.en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHydrology and Water Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-05-29T11:58:52Z
html.description.abstractAdequate Water Resources Administration in Congo is a major concern for its government and its people. Water resources administration is a dilemma for government throughout the world, and Congo is no exception. An assessment of water resources administration practices in Congo today reveals several inadequacies attributable to deficiencies in the framework for decision making in the use and allocation of water resources. Actually, the entire field of water resources administration is dominated by one level the national government. In Congo, there is no water law to guide water development. It is known today that the administration of water resources in Congo is notorious for its inability to provide for the public welfare, partly because the structure of decision making is not conducive to an accurate definition of the public interest. There are no specific water organizations at the local level to represent water users and provide the delivery of essential water services, whereas this is the area which is critical to the enhancement of economic and public welfare. The institutional problem in water resources administration in Congo may be helped by adopting one of the three models proposed in this thesis. The first model will be the alternative of organizing water institutions by level of government. The second alternative will organize water institutions on the basis of resource geometry. While the third will be a mixed institutional model between the two systems above. If these models are adopted, successful social and economic development.


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