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dc.contributor.authorHuntoon, Peter W.
dc.creatorHuntoon, Peter W.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-11-28T13:56:56Z
dc.date.available2011-11-28T13:56:56Z
dc.date.issued1968en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/191507
dc.description.abstractNorth of the Grand Canyon, water from precipitation infiltrates into the permeable Kaibab Formation which outcrops over the Kaibab and Kanab Plateaus. Water moves vertically downward through a karst drainage network in the Kaibab and Toroweap Formations until it reaches semi-permeable clastic sediments. A portion of the water is perched above these beds and flows toward the west under a gradient imposed on the system by the gentle westward regional dip of the strata. Some of the westward flowing water discharges directly into Tapeats Amphitheater from seeps and small springs but most of it drains into the north-south trending West Kaibab Fault Zone. In the Fault zone, the water encounters large vertical rock permeabilities and readily circulates downward through the otherwise semi-permeable clastic strata to the lower limestone units. At depth, the water is conducted southward to the Grand Canyon in solution tubes which have been dissolved along the fault zone. Within a few miles of the Tapeats Amphitheater, the water is pirated from the Muav Fault of the West Kaibab Fault Zone and moves toward the southwest through solution tubes developed along minor faults in the limestones to discharge points OOO feet below the plateaus in Tapeats Canyon. To the west, a similar but smaller karst system discharges water into Deer Canyon.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology.
dc.subjectKarst -- Arizona.
dc.subjectHydrology, Karst -- Arizona.
dc.subjectGeology -- Arizona -- Grand Canyon Region.
dc.titleHydrogeology of the Tapeats Amphitheater and Deer Basin, Grand Canyon, Arizona: a study in karst hydrology.en_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.contributor.chairHarshbarger, John W.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc225190596en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWright, Jerome J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberEvans, Daniel D.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMayo, Evans B.en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHydrology and Water Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-24T11:08:30Z
html.description.abstractNorth of the Grand Canyon, water from precipitation infiltrates into the permeable Kaibab Formation which outcrops over the Kaibab and Kanab Plateaus. Water moves vertically downward through a karst drainage network in the Kaibab and Toroweap Formations until it reaches semi-permeable clastic sediments. A portion of the water is perched above these beds and flows toward the west under a gradient imposed on the system by the gentle westward regional dip of the strata. Some of the westward flowing water discharges directly into Tapeats Amphitheater from seeps and small springs but most of it drains into the north-south trending West Kaibab Fault Zone. In the Fault zone, the water encounters large vertical rock permeabilities and readily circulates downward through the otherwise semi-permeable clastic strata to the lower limestone units. At depth, the water is conducted southward to the Grand Canyon in solution tubes which have been dissolved along the fault zone. Within a few miles of the Tapeats Amphitheater, the water is pirated from the Muav Fault of the West Kaibab Fault Zone and moves toward the southwest through solution tubes developed along minor faults in the limestones to discharge points OOO feet below the plateaus in Tapeats Canyon. To the west, a similar but smaller karst system discharges water into Deer Canyon.


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