Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMuller, Anthony B.
dc.creatorMuller, Anthony B.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-11-28T13:59:36Z
dc.date.available2011-11-28T13:59:36Z
dc.date.issued1974en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/191593
dc.description.abstractThe replacement of solutes in a saline solution by a replacer chemical across an osmotic membrane, and the subsequent removal of the chemical by virtue of its special removal characteristics, comprises salt replacement desalination. Any of a number of removal processes may be coupled to the replacement step, the process being determined by characteristics of the replacer. Ultrafiltration is examined as a removal process with sucrose as the replacer chemical. A theoretical treatment of osmotic flow across semipermeable membranes is presented in terms of phenomenological and first-order transport equations. The pore flow and solution-diffusion models of the transport kinetics of such osmotic flows are derived. An experimental examination of the ultrafiltration of sucrose shows that higher flux membranes operated at lower pressures than reverse osmosis offer comparable product fluxes. Such a system would, thus, not require the high-pressure apparatus required for reverse osmosis. Experimental results also show that a constant separation relationship exists between concentrate and permiate at operating pressures above the osmotic pressure of the retinate, and that the separation characteristics of membranes of different cutoff levels with solutes of molecular weight well below the cutoff level being filtered are similar. These findings indicate that salt replacement with ultrafiltration has strong possibilities for development as a large-scale desalination method.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology.
dc.subjectSaline water conversion -- Reverse osmosis process.
dc.titleDesalination by salt replacement and ultrafiltration.en_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.contributor.chairEvans, Daniel D.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc213387074en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberInce, Simonen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSimpson, Eugene S.en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHydrology and Water Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-24T11:21:42Z
html.description.abstractThe replacement of solutes in a saline solution by a replacer chemical across an osmotic membrane, and the subsequent removal of the chemical by virtue of its special removal characteristics, comprises salt replacement desalination. Any of a number of removal processes may be coupled to the replacement step, the process being determined by characteristics of the replacer. Ultrafiltration is examined as a removal process with sucrose as the replacer chemical. A theoretical treatment of osmotic flow across semipermeable membranes is presented in terms of phenomenological and first-order transport equations. The pore flow and solution-diffusion models of the transport kinetics of such osmotic flows are derived. An experimental examination of the ultrafiltration of sucrose shows that higher flux membranes operated at lower pressures than reverse osmosis offer comparable product fluxes. Such a system would, thus, not require the high-pressure apparatus required for reverse osmosis. Experimental results also show that a constant separation relationship exists between concentrate and permiate at operating pressures above the osmotic pressure of the retinate, and that the separation characteristics of membranes of different cutoff levels with solutes of molecular weight well below the cutoff level being filtered are similar. These findings indicate that salt replacement with ultrafiltration has strong possibilities for development as a large-scale desalination method.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
azu_td_hy_e9791_1974_174_sip1_w.pdf
Size:
5.783Mb
Format:
PDF
Description:
azu_td_hy_e9791_1974_174_sip1_w.pdf

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record