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dc.contributor.authorHulburt, Margery Ann.
dc.creatorHulburt, Margery Ann.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-11-28T14:02:36Z
dc.date.available2011-11-28T14:02:36Z
dc.date.issued1979en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/191685
dc.description.abstractGillette, Wyoming is the center of growth associated with coal development in the Eastern Powder River Coal Basin of Wyoming. Rapid growth in the area is resulting in a three-way competition for limited ground-water supplies among the city, the subdivisions just outside of the city limits, and coal strip mines. Major aquifers in the Gillette area are, in order of depth, the Wasatch, Fort Union, and Fox Hills Formations. Study of geologic and hydrologic data indicates that water in the Wasatch aquifer occurs in ancient stream channels trending to the northwest. Although mining is expected to have little affect on the municipal well field, a potential for pollutant movement from the city landfill to the well field area exists. Possible alternatives for ground-water development to meet increased demand include greater pumpage from the Wasatch and Fort Union aquifers, further exploration and development of the Fox Hills aquifer, and importation of water. Before the Gillette area can arrive at a solution to its water problems that is environmentally and economically sound, the mining companies, the City of Gillette, and the surrounding subdivisions must begin working as a group instead of in competition with one another.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology.
dc.subjectGroundwater -- Wyoming -- Gillette.
dc.subjectWater-supply -- Wyoming -- Gillette.
dc.titleHydrogeology of the Gillette area, Wyomingen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.contributor.chairDavis, Stanley N.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc213275973en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHydrology and Water Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-07-14T11:26:25Z
html.description.abstractGillette, Wyoming is the center of growth associated with coal development in the Eastern Powder River Coal Basin of Wyoming. Rapid growth in the area is resulting in a three-way competition for limited ground-water supplies among the city, the subdivisions just outside of the city limits, and coal strip mines. Major aquifers in the Gillette area are, in order of depth, the Wasatch, Fort Union, and Fox Hills Formations. Study of geologic and hydrologic data indicates that water in the Wasatch aquifer occurs in ancient stream channels trending to the northwest. Although mining is expected to have little affect on the municipal well field, a potential for pollutant movement from the city landfill to the well field area exists. Possible alternatives for ground-water development to meet increased demand include greater pumpage from the Wasatch and Fort Union aquifers, further exploration and development of the Fox Hills aquifer, and importation of water. Before the Gillette area can arrive at a solution to its water problems that is environmentally and economically sound, the mining companies, the City of Gillette, and the surrounding subdivisions must begin working as a group instead of in competition with one another.


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