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dc.contributor.authorKeith, Susan Jo.
dc.creatorKeith, Susan Jo.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-11-28T14:03:56Z
dc.date.available2011-11-28T14:03:56Z
dc.date.issued1981en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/191719
dc.description.abstractRecent legislation requires ground water in the Tucson Basin to be managed under a safe yield concept which restricts pumpage to annual recharge. This study develops a knowledge of ephemeral flow recharge and its implications for management under a safe yield concept. Analyses of several types of hydrologic data from the Tucson Basin indicate the following about ephemeral flow recharge: (1) most recharge along piedmont-draining channels occurs in the summer and most recharge along mountain-draining channels occurs in winter; (2) the winter flow regime has the highest recharge rate of 90 percent of flow into a reach on the Rillito Creek system; the summer flow regime recharges 80 percent and the extreme event flow regime only 45 percent; (3) near-surface ground-water levels lead to low recharge conditions along the Santa Cruz River until 1950 when water levels began dropping; and (4) the period of 1930-1960 was characterized by summer flow dominance and lower average annual flow volumes than the period of 1960- 1980, which began an episode of heavy winter flow and higher average annual flow. These results are used to recommend: (1) the time period from which to calculate the highest natural recharge value; (2) well field locations; and (3) artificial recharge program considerations.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshArtificial groundwater recharge.en_US
dc.subject.lcshArtificial groundwater recharge -- Arizona -- Tucson Basin.en_US
dc.subject.lcshStream measurements -- Arizona -- Tucson Basin.en_US
dc.titleStream channel recharge in the Tucson Basin and its implications for ground-water managementen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.contributor.chairDeCook, K. J.en_US
dc.contributor.chairWilson, L. G.en_US
dc.contributor.chairEvans, Daniel D.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc212907024en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDavis, Donald R.en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHydrology and Water Resources Administrationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-05-18T10:32:19Z
html.description.abstractRecent legislation requires ground water in the Tucson Basin to be managed under a safe yield concept which restricts pumpage to annual recharge. This study develops a knowledge of ephemeral flow recharge and its implications for management under a safe yield concept. Analyses of several types of hydrologic data from the Tucson Basin indicate the following about ephemeral flow recharge: (1) most recharge along piedmont-draining channels occurs in the summer and most recharge along mountain-draining channels occurs in winter; (2) the winter flow regime has the highest recharge rate of 90 percent of flow into a reach on the Rillito Creek system; the summer flow regime recharges 80 percent and the extreme event flow regime only 45 percent; (3) near-surface ground-water levels lead to low recharge conditions along the Santa Cruz River until 1950 when water levels began dropping; and (4) the period of 1930-1960 was characterized by summer flow dominance and lower average annual flow volumes than the period of 1960- 1980, which began an episode of heavy winter flow and higher average annual flow. These results are used to recommend: (1) the time period from which to calculate the highest natural recharge value; (2) well field locations; and (3) artificial recharge program considerations.


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