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dc.contributor.authorBrooks, Margaret Ann*
dc.creatorBrooks, Margaret Annen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-11-28T14:07:38Z
dc.date.available2011-11-28T14:07:38Z
dc.date.issued1984en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/191826
dc.description.abstractIn rapidly growing urban areas of the arid Southwest, increasingly larger proportions of paved surfaces heighten both stormwater runoff rates and their volume. Retainment of runoff within new land developments is now required by many cities. This study looks at policies and design specifications that enable neighborhood-scale flood control facilities to be utilized as recreational amenities. Its major objective is to exhibit an expanded range of design solutions that encourage "dual-use," in the form of a design guidelines manual aimed toward engineers, landscape architects, and other design professionals.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshStorm water retention basins -- Arizona -- Phoenix.en_US
dc.subject.lcshUrban beautification -- Arizona -- Phoenix.en_US
dc.subject.lcshRecreation areas -- Arizona.en_US
dc.titlePhysical and political parameters relevant to design for recreational use at stormwater retention basins in Phoenix, Arizonaen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.contributor.chairHebel, Susan J.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc12719209en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHebel, Susan J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWilkin, Donovanen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHavens, William H.en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRenewable Natural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.L. Arch.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-18T17:59:08Z
html.description.abstractIn rapidly growing urban areas of the arid Southwest, increasingly larger proportions of paved surfaces heighten both stormwater runoff rates and their volume. Retainment of runoff within new land developments is now required by many cities. This study looks at policies and design specifications that enable neighborhood-scale flood control facilities to be utilized as recreational amenities. Its major objective is to exhibit an expanded range of design solutions that encourage "dual-use," in the form of a design guidelines manual aimed toward engineers, landscape architects, and other design professionals.


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