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dc.contributor.authorKilbury, Richard Kenneth.
dc.creatorKilbury, Richard Kenneth.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-11-28T14:07:48Z
dc.date.available2011-11-28T14:07:48Z
dc.date.issued1984en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/191831
dc.description.abstractSurface water intake into a fractured rock system provides water for downward percolation and transport of contaminants. This study involves the measurement and simulation of water intake across the atmosphere-earth boundary, for an exposed densely welded tuff, near Patagonia, Arizona. Water and air intake rates were measured using a fractured rock infiltrometer (FRI). Calculated fracture apertures using water and air agreed Well. Fracture apertures determined using water range from 1.0 to 33.7 pm and are shown to be log-normally distributed. Rainfall events are reconstructed in a model to simulate flow across the atmosphere-earth boundary. As an example a ten-year simulation resulted in a mean annual intake rate of 2.1 millimeters (mm), and is shown to be more dependent on storm duration than intensity. Developed methods provide a means of characterizing water intake rates into a fractured rock surface based on rainfall characteristics.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology.
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona -- Patagonia Region.
dc.subjectHydraulics.
dc.subjectRain and rainfall -- Arizona -- Patagonia Region.
dc.titleWater intake at the atmosphere-earth interface in a fractured rock system near Patagonia, Arizonaen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.contributor.chairEvans, Daniel D.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc213299585en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSimpson, Eugene S.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSorooshian, Sorooshen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHydrology and Water Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-24T13:03:10Z
html.description.abstractSurface water intake into a fractured rock system provides water for downward percolation and transport of contaminants. This study involves the measurement and simulation of water intake across the atmosphere-earth boundary, for an exposed densely welded tuff, near Patagonia, Arizona. Water and air intake rates were measured using a fractured rock infiltrometer (FRI). Calculated fracture apertures using water and air agreed Well. Fracture apertures determined using water range from 1.0 to 33.7 pm and are shown to be log-normally distributed. Rainfall events are reconstructed in a model to simulate flow across the atmosphere-earth boundary. As an example a ten-year simulation resulted in a mean annual intake rate of 2.1 millimeters (mm), and is shown to be more dependent on storm duration than intensity. Developed methods provide a means of characterizing water intake rates into a fractured rock surface based on rainfall characteristics.


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