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dc.contributor.advisorGreen, Linda B.en_US
dc.contributor.authorVogt, Wendy Alexandra
dc.creatorVogt, Wendy Alexandraen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-05T14:11:30Z
dc.date.available2011-12-05T14:11:30Z
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/193249
dc.description.abstractMexican neoliberalism has systematically undermined Mexico's rural and indigenous populations and created multiple forms of displacement in communities and individual lives. This thesis traces the impacts of displacement in the lives of Mixtec families living and working on the U.S.-Mexico border. As families encounter new circumstances of risk, violation and vulnerability, they develop material, spatial and social strategies to provide safe and meaningful lives, often through contradictory and uneven processes. Central to these processes are power relations and negotiations of class, ethnicity and gender, which both maintain community and continuity as well as further perpetuate systems of inequality and differentiation between groups, families and individuals. The focus on indigenous peoples in Nogales fills important gaps in the literature of indigenous transnational migrants and the U.S-Mexico border, particularly in light of recent border policies, which are pushing more people to the Arizona-Sonora desert region.
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectDisplacementen_US
dc.subjectNeoliberalismen_US
dc.subjectU.S.-Mexico borderen_US
dc.subjectMixtecen_US
dc.titleTracing Neoliberalism in Mexico: Historical Displacement and Survival Strategies for Mixtec Families living on the U.S.-Mexico Borderen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.contributor.chairGreen, Linda B.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc137356196en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1640en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.nameMAen_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-14T03:56:48Z
html.description.abstractMexican neoliberalism has systematically undermined Mexico's rural and indigenous populations and created multiple forms of displacement in communities and individual lives. This thesis traces the impacts of displacement in the lives of Mixtec families living and working on the U.S.-Mexico border. As families encounter new circumstances of risk, violation and vulnerability, they develop material, spatial and social strategies to provide safe and meaningful lives, often through contradictory and uneven processes. Central to these processes are power relations and negotiations of class, ethnicity and gender, which both maintain community and continuity as well as further perpetuate systems of inequality and differentiation between groups, families and individuals. The focus on indigenous peoples in Nogales fills important gaps in the literature of indigenous transnational migrants and the U.S-Mexico border, particularly in light of recent border policies, which are pushing more people to the Arizona-Sonora desert region.


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