Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorNichter, Mimien_US
dc.contributor.authorPenney, Lauren
dc.creatorPenney, Laurenen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-05T14:11:53Z
dc.date.available2011-12-05T14:11:53Z
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/193262
dc.description.abstractDiscourses surrounding the idea of the Freshman 15 are prevalent within the press and popular media. While college weight gain and eating and exercise practices have been attended to through the collection of survey data, to date no one has linked these trends to wider social and economic processes or contextualized them within the lives of college students. This thesis provides a description of the ways in which 22 college women came to anticipate and experience weight gain during their freshman year of college, as well as the practices they adopted that contributed to weight changes. I analyze this interview data through a discussion of the concept of risk, personal responsibility, and ideas about the female body, while pointing to broader political economic pressures that are changing the ways in which universities provide dining and recreation services to students.
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectcollege studenten_US
dc.subjectfemaleen_US
dc.subjectFreshman 15en_US
dc.subjecteating and exercise practicesen_US
dc.subjectweight controlen_US
dc.subjectdining servicesen_US
dc.titleFemale College Students' Experiences with the Freshman 15en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.contributor.chairNichter, Mimien_US
dc.identifier.oclc659746505en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1939en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.nameMAen_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-04-26T14:00:34Z
html.description.abstractDiscourses surrounding the idea of the Freshman 15 are prevalent within the press and popular media. While college weight gain and eating and exercise practices have been attended to through the collection of survey data, to date no one has linked these trends to wider social and economic processes or contextualized them within the lives of college students. This thesis provides a description of the ways in which 22 college women came to anticipate and experience weight gain during their freshman year of college, as well as the practices they adopted that contributed to weight changes. I analyze this interview data through a discussion of the concept of risk, personal responsibility, and ideas about the female body, while pointing to broader political economic pressures that are changing the ways in which universities provide dining and recreation services to students.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
azu_etd_1939_sip1_m.pdf
Size:
635.9Kb
Format:
PDF
Description:
azu_etd_1939_sip1_m.pdf

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record