Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorForster, Kenneth I.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGorbunova, Anastasia A.
dc.creatorGorbunova, Anastasia A.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-05T14:12:06Z
dc.date.available2011-12-05T14:12:06Z
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/193269
dc.description.abstractLetter position plays an important role in lexical access. But are some positions more important than the others? Findings from numerous studies support the notion that in lexical access, initial letters produce strongest activation, which weakens towards the end of the word. In order to create a metric for computing the activation produced by each letter position in a correctly spelled word versus a word in which some or all letters are transposed, the formula for calculating a word's orthographic match coefficient (OMC) was developed and tested. Utilizing the masked priming paradigm and a lexical decision task, Experiments 1-5 test the accuracy and reliability of the OMC predictions, and look at neighborhood density in conjunction with different types of letter movement. Results from these experiments provide empirical support for the OMC as a reliable predictor of priming that involves transposed letters, and offer insight into possible mechanisms of word recognition.
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectvisual word recognitionen_US
dc.subjectmasked primingen_US
dc.subjectlexical decisionen_US
dc.subjecttransposition letter primingen_US
dc.titleA Metric for Orthographic Similarity: Theory and Implicationsen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.contributor.chairForster, Kenneth I.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659748079en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
dc.identifier.proquest2210en_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.nameMAen_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-29T21:30:08Z
html.description.abstractLetter position plays an important role in lexical access. But are some positions more important than the others? Findings from numerous studies support the notion that in lexical access, initial letters produce strongest activation, which weakens towards the end of the word. In order to create a metric for computing the activation produced by each letter position in a correctly spelled word versus a word in which some or all letters are transposed, the formula for calculating a word's orthographic match coefficient (OMC) was developed and tested. Utilizing the masked priming paradigm and a lexical decision task, Experiments 1-5 test the accuracy and reliability of the OMC predictions, and look at neighborhood density in conjunction with different types of letter movement. Results from these experiments provide empirical support for the OMC as a reliable predictor of priming that involves transposed letters, and offer insight into possible mechanisms of word recognition.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
azu_etd_2210_sip1_m.pdf
Size:
475.0Kb
Format:
PDF
Description:
azu_etd_2210_sip1_m.pdf

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record