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dc.contributor.advisorGimblett, Randyen_US
dc.contributor.authorMaloney, Meghan Lea
dc.creatorMaloney, Meghan Leaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-05T14:13:18Z
dc.date.available2011-12-05T14:13:18Z
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/193310
dc.description.abstractConflicts over the optimal allocation of water resources are no longer just a concern but political reality. Increasing population and demands, competing uses, as well as uncertainty over scientific processes all add to the complexity of water management and in turn can lead to complex, difficult, and long standing water conflicts. This research employs Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to evaluate water conflict in interstate settings and examines the relationship between commonly held conceptions of water conflict and actual events. Results reveal a low number of observations in each of the examined basins. Each basin has a unique relationship with the evaluated variables and the use of GIS reveals distinct spatial relationships for conflicts. However, the modifiable unit areal problem presents a real concern for continued application. Results also reveal that generalizing indicators of conflict across basins loses the inherent variability and nuanced relationships that are seen through a basin-by-basin analysis.
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectwateren_US
dc.subjectconflicten_US
dc.subjectinterstateen_US
dc.subjectGISen_US
dc.subjecttransboundaryen_US
dc.titleRivers of Discontent: Indicators of Water Conflict in Interstate River Basins of The American Southwesten_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.contributor.chairGimblett, Randyen_US
dc.identifier.oclc659749777en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSchlager, Edellaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGuertin, Philen_US
dc.identifier.proquest2746en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNatural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.nameMSen_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-17T18:19:49Z
html.description.abstractConflicts over the optimal allocation of water resources are no longer just a concern but political reality. Increasing population and demands, competing uses, as well as uncertainty over scientific processes all add to the complexity of water management and in turn can lead to complex, difficult, and long standing water conflicts. This research employs Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to evaluate water conflict in interstate settings and examines the relationship between commonly held conceptions of water conflict and actual events. Results reveal a low number of observations in each of the examined basins. Each basin has a unique relationship with the evaluated variables and the use of GIS reveals distinct spatial relationships for conflicts. However, the modifiable unit areal problem presents a real concern for continued application. Results also reveal that generalizing indicators of conflict across basins loses the inherent variability and nuanced relationships that are seen through a basin-by-basin analysis.


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