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dc.contributor.advisorMeixner, Thomasen_US
dc.contributor.authorLindsey, Melanie*
dc.creatorLindsey, Melanieen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-05T14:18:29Z
dc.date.available2011-12-05T14:18:29Z
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/193445
dc.description.abstractIn developing a water quality monitoring program, the sampling frequency chosen should be able to reliably detect changes in water quality trends. Three datasets are evaluated for Minimal Detectable Change in surface water quality to examine the loss of trend detectability as sampling frequency decreases for sites within the National Park Service's Sonoran Desert Network by re-sampling the records as quarterly and annual datasets and by superimposing step and linear trends over the natural data to estimate the time it takes the Seasonal Kendall Test to detect trends of a specific threshold. Wilcoxon Rank Sum analyses found that monthly and quarterly sampling consistently draw from the same distribution of trend detection times; however, annual sampling can take significantly longer. Therefore, even with a loss in power from reduced sampling, quarterly sampling of Park waters adequately detects trends (70%) compared to monthly whereas annual sampling is insufficient in trend detection (30%).
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectSampling Frequencyen_US
dc.subjectSeasonal Kendall Testen_US
dc.subjectTrend Analysisen_US
dc.subjectWater Qualityen_US
dc.titleSampling Frequency for Semi-Arid Streams and Rivers: Implications for National Parks in the Sonoran Desert Networken_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.contributor.chairMeixner, Thomasen_US
dc.identifier.oclc752260960en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMcIntosh, Jennifer C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberValdes, Juan B.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest10834en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHydrologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-14T04:17:15Z
html.description.abstractIn developing a water quality monitoring program, the sampling frequency chosen should be able to reliably detect changes in water quality trends. Three datasets are evaluated for Minimal Detectable Change in surface water quality to examine the loss of trend detectability as sampling frequency decreases for sites within the National Park Service's Sonoran Desert Network by re-sampling the records as quarterly and annual datasets and by superimposing step and linear trends over the natural data to estimate the time it takes the Seasonal Kendall Test to detect trends of a specific threshold. Wilcoxon Rank Sum analyses found that monthly and quarterly sampling consistently draw from the same distribution of trend detection times; however, annual sampling can take significantly longer. Therefore, even with a loss in power from reduced sampling, quarterly sampling of Park waters adequately detects trends (70%) compared to monthly whereas annual sampling is insufficient in trend detection (30%).


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