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dc.contributor.advisorPlante, Elena Men_US
dc.contributor.authorBahl, Megha*
dc.creatorBahl, Meghaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-05T21:54:47Z
dc.date.available2011-12-05T21:54:47Z
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/193598
dc.description.abstractA novel word learning paradigm in a reading context was employed to investigate the ability of adults with and without learning disability to learn new words. The participants were required to read a short English story. The story was based on an Indian folk tale to eliminate any confounding effect of familiarity with content. Two nouns and two verbs from the story were replaced by novel words. The story was read in three sections. The target non-words occurred once in the first section, allowing for fast mapping of the words. The non-words occurred three times each in the second and the third sections of the story allowing for additional slow mapping. After reading each section, participants were tested for different aspects of lexical acquisition such as production of words, comprehension of the content, and grammatical knowledge associated with the non-word. This allowed for an examination of the growth in learning with increased exposure to the words in context. Results indicated that the normal language group performed significantly better than the learning disability group. Moreover, nouns were more easily learned than verbs. The overall performance of both groups improved with each section read, suggesting that more experience with the word assisted learning of novel forms.
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.titleWord Learning by Adults with Learning Disability: Effect of Grammatical Classen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.contributor.chairPlante, Elena Men_US
dc.identifier.oclc659755022en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPlante, Elenaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAlt, Maryen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDeDe, Gayleen_US
dc.identifier.proquest11084en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpeech, Language, & Hearing Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-24T18:42:01Z
html.description.abstractA novel word learning paradigm in a reading context was employed to investigate the ability of adults with and without learning disability to learn new words. The participants were required to read a short English story. The story was based on an Indian folk tale to eliminate any confounding effect of familiarity with content. Two nouns and two verbs from the story were replaced by novel words. The story was read in three sections. The target non-words occurred once in the first section, allowing for fast mapping of the words. The non-words occurred three times each in the second and the third sections of the story allowing for additional slow mapping. After reading each section, participants were tested for different aspects of lexical acquisition such as production of words, comprehension of the content, and grammatical knowledge associated with the non-word. This allowed for an examination of the growth in learning with increased exposure to the words in context. Results indicated that the normal language group performed significantly better than the learning disability group. Moreover, nouns were more easily learned than verbs. The overall performance of both groups improved with each section read, suggesting that more experience with the word assisted learning of novel forms.


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