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dc.contributor.authorKuwahara, Sara Sadae
dc.creatorKuwahara, Sara Sadaeen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-05T22:00:56Z
dc.date.available2011-12-05T22:00:56Z
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/193744
dc.description.abstractSemiconductor nanocrystals, otherwise known as Quantum dots (Q dots), are a new type of fluorophore that demonstrates many advantages over conventional organic fluorophores. These advantages offer the opportunity to improve known immunofluorescent methods and immunofluorescent biosensors for rapid and portable bacterial detection in water. The detection of the micro organism Escherichia coli O157:H7 by attenuation of a fluorophore’s signal in water was evaluated alone and in the presence of another bacterial species. A sandwich immunoassay with antibodies adhered to SU-8 as a conventional comparison to our novel attenuation detection was also conducted. The assays were tested for concentration determination as well as investigation for cross reactivity and interference from other bacteria and from partial target cells. In order to immobilize the capture antibodies on SU-8, an existing immobilization self-assembly monolayer (SAM) for glass was modified. The SAM was composed of a silane ((3-Mercaptopropyl) trimethoxysilane (MTS)) and hetero-bifunctional cross linker (N-γ-maleimidobutyryloxy succinimide ester (GMBS)) was utilized in this procedure. The SU-8 surface was activated using various acids baths and oxygenated plasma, and it was determined that the oxygenated plasma yielded the best surface attachment of antibodies. The use of direct fluorophore signal attenuation for detection of the target E. coli resulted in the lowest detectable population of 1x10¹ cfu/mL. It was not specific enough for quantitative assessment of target concentration, but could accurately differentiate between targeted and non-targeted species. The sandwich immunofluorescent detection on SU-8 attained the lowest detectable population of 1x10⁴ cfu/ml. The presence of Klebsiella pneumoniae in solution caused some interference with detection either from cross reactivity or binding site blocking. Partial target cells also caused interference with the detection of the target species, mainly by blocking binding sites so that differences in concentration were not discernable. The signal attenuation not only had a better lowest detectable population but also had less measurement error than the sandwich immunoassay on SU-8 which suffered from non-uniformed surface coverage by the antibodies.
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectBacterial detectionen_US
dc.subjectBiosensoren_US
dc.subjectImmuno assayen_US
dc.subjectQuantum doten_US
dc.subjectSemiconductor nanocrystalsen_US
dc.titleQuantum Dot Applications for Detection of Bacteria in Wateren_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.contributor.chairCuello, Joelen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRiley, Marken_US
dc.contributor.committeememberYoon, Jeong-Yeolen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGerba, Charlesen_US
dc.identifier.proquest10445en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAgricultural & Biosystems Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-26T09:51:27Z
html.description.abstractSemiconductor nanocrystals, otherwise known as Quantum dots (Q dots), are a new type of fluorophore that demonstrates many advantages over conventional organic fluorophores. These advantages offer the opportunity to improve known immunofluorescent methods and immunofluorescent biosensors for rapid and portable bacterial detection in water. The detection of the micro organism Escherichia coli O157:H7 by attenuation of a fluorophore’s signal in water was evaluated alone and in the presence of another bacterial species. A sandwich immunoassay with antibodies adhered to SU-8 as a conventional comparison to our novel attenuation detection was also conducted. The assays were tested for concentration determination as well as investigation for cross reactivity and interference from other bacteria and from partial target cells. In order to immobilize the capture antibodies on SU-8, an existing immobilization self-assembly monolayer (SAM) for glass was modified. The SAM was composed of a silane ((3-Mercaptopropyl) trimethoxysilane (MTS)) and hetero-bifunctional cross linker (N-γ-maleimidobutyryloxy succinimide ester (GMBS)) was utilized in this procedure. The SU-8 surface was activated using various acids baths and oxygenated plasma, and it was determined that the oxygenated plasma yielded the best surface attachment of antibodies. The use of direct fluorophore signal attenuation for detection of the target E. coli resulted in the lowest detectable population of 1x10¹ cfu/mL. It was not specific enough for quantitative assessment of target concentration, but could accurately differentiate between targeted and non-targeted species. The sandwich immunofluorescent detection on SU-8 attained the lowest detectable population of 1x10⁴ cfu/ml. The presence of Klebsiella pneumoniae in solution caused some interference with detection either from cross reactivity or binding site blocking. Partial target cells also caused interference with the detection of the target species, mainly by blocking binding sites so that differences in concentration were not discernable. The signal attenuation not only had a better lowest detectable population but also had less measurement error than the sandwich immunoassay on SU-8 which suffered from non-uniformed surface coverage by the antibodies.


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