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dc.contributor.advisorFan, Paulaen_US
dc.contributor.authorLipke-Perry, Tracy Donna
dc.creatorLipke-Perry, Tracy Donnaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-05T22:06:06Z
dc.date.available2011-12-05T22:06:06Z
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/193854
dc.description.abstractChopin's twenty-seven études are both unique and standard within the genre of advanced piano literature. Having been composed as the instrument itself was standardized and on the heels of the didactic studies of the classical period, Chopin's études are widely heralded as exemplary pedagogical material for their uniform quality and comprehensiveness. Nevertheless, despite the vast number of resources devoted to the topic of how one might approach the études and the innumerable endorsements which tout their incomparable worth, relatively cursory mention is made of their musical value. From a physiological perspective, what makes Chopin's études exceptional amongst vast pedagogical repertory, and how does their musical value impact what pianists learn from their study?From a modern perspective, a musical image is both the model and the yardstick for the measure of technical achievement as one compares performance with his or her musical image. The Chopin études are therefore unique in two ways. First, a pianist's musical image of each of the Chopin études initiates an individual process of motor learning. The musical images, and therefore the goals and the processes, are inherently different from the vast majority of purely didactic studies and exercises. Secondly, the genius of Chopin permeates the overall conception of the études as he intuitively employed the human ability to develop motor skills in natural ways which continue to be understood and supported by ongoing research.This paper explores the Chopin études from a largely physiological and psychological perspective such that modern studies of mental imagery, skill acquisition, and human motor abilities converge and highlight what is readily available in the music itself.
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectetudeen_US
dc.subjectphysiologyen_US
dc.subjectimageryen_US
dc.subjectpiano techniqueen_US
dc.titleIntegrating Piano Technique, Physiology, and Motor Learning: Strategies for Performing the Chopin Etudesen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.contributor.chairFan, Paulaen_US
dc.identifier.oclc659750560en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGibson, Tannisen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberZdechlik, Lisaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest2930en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMusicen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.nameDMAen_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-24T20:38:52Z
html.description.abstractChopin's twenty-seven études are both unique and standard within the genre of advanced piano literature. Having been composed as the instrument itself was standardized and on the heels of the didactic studies of the classical period, Chopin's études are widely heralded as exemplary pedagogical material for their uniform quality and comprehensiveness. Nevertheless, despite the vast number of resources devoted to the topic of how one might approach the études and the innumerable endorsements which tout their incomparable worth, relatively cursory mention is made of their musical value. From a physiological perspective, what makes Chopin's études exceptional amongst vast pedagogical repertory, and how does their musical value impact what pianists learn from their study?From a modern perspective, a musical image is both the model and the yardstick for the measure of technical achievement as one compares performance with his or her musical image. The Chopin études are therefore unique in two ways. First, a pianist's musical image of each of the Chopin études initiates an individual process of motor learning. The musical images, and therefore the goals and the processes, are inherently different from the vast majority of purely didactic studies and exercises. Secondly, the genius of Chopin permeates the overall conception of the études as he intuitively employed the human ability to develop motor skills in natural ways which continue to be understood and supported by ongoing research.This paper explores the Chopin études from a largely physiological and psychological perspective such that modern studies of mental imagery, skill acquisition, and human motor abilities converge and highlight what is readily available in the music itself.


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