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dc.contributor.advisorAllen, John J.B.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAccortt, Eynav Elgavish
dc.creatorAccortt, Eynav Elgavishen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-05T22:06:28Z
dc.date.available2011-12-05T22:06:28Z
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/193864
dc.description.abstractPremenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) is a severe dysphoric form of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) that is included as a diagnosis for further study in the DSM-IV (APA, 2000). A primary aim of the present study was to characterize the co-occurrence of PMDD and major depression, in a sample that spans the entire range of depressive severity. The range included non-depressed controls, women meeting criteria for dysthymia, and women meeting criteria for current Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). Co-occurrence of MDD and PMDD were only statistically significant when considering Lifetime MDD. Resting frontal electroencephalographic (EEG) asymmetry has been hypothesized to tap a diathesis toward depression or other emotion-related psychopathology. Another primary aim was to assess Frontal EEG asymmetry in college women who meet criteria for Pre-Menstrual Dysphoric Disorder (n = 25) and 25 matched controls. Participants were assessed four times in a two week period. Women reporting low premenstrual dysphoric symptomatology exhibited greater relative left frontal activity at rest than did women high in premenstrual dysphoric symptomatology. These results are consistent with a diathesis-stress model for premenstrual dysphoric symptomatology. A secondary aim was to assess whether individuals with PMDD or menstrual related mood variability, but no current diagnosis of depression, have an increased family history of depression. Promising evidence of a relationship between family history of MDD and a likelihood of PMDD was discovered. A trend was found for Spectrum PMDD women: a higher rate of Family History of MDD (36%) than non PMDD women (19.6%). Ideally, resting frontal electroencephalographic (EEG) asymmetry could help us learn more about the etiology of depression and hormonal-related depression specifically, and test whether they may share etiological factors.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectdepressionen_US
dc.subjectdiathesis-stressen_US
dc.subjectfamily historyen_US
dc.subjectfrontal alpha electroencephalography (EEG) asymmetryen_US
dc.subjectpre-menstral dysphoric disorderen_US
dc.subjectrisk factoren_US
dc.titleFRONTAL ALPHA ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHY (EEG) ASYMMETRY AS A RISK FACTOR FOR PRE-MENSTRUAL DYSPHORIC DISORDER (PMDD); A PSYCHOPHYSIOLOGICAL AND FAMILY HISTORY APPROACH.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.contributor.chairAllen, John J.B.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659752106en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKaszniak, Alfred W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBootzin, Richarden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSbarra, Daviden_US
dc.identifier.proquest10263en_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-24T20:40:28Z
html.description.abstractPremenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) is a severe dysphoric form of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) that is included as a diagnosis for further study in the DSM-IV (APA, 2000). A primary aim of the present study was to characterize the co-occurrence of PMDD and major depression, in a sample that spans the entire range of depressive severity. The range included non-depressed controls, women meeting criteria for dysthymia, and women meeting criteria for current Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). Co-occurrence of MDD and PMDD were only statistically significant when considering Lifetime MDD. Resting frontal electroencephalographic (EEG) asymmetry has been hypothesized to tap a diathesis toward depression or other emotion-related psychopathology. Another primary aim was to assess Frontal EEG asymmetry in college women who meet criteria for Pre-Menstrual Dysphoric Disorder (n = 25) and 25 matched controls. Participants were assessed four times in a two week period. Women reporting low premenstrual dysphoric symptomatology exhibited greater relative left frontal activity at rest than did women high in premenstrual dysphoric symptomatology. These results are consistent with a diathesis-stress model for premenstrual dysphoric symptomatology. A secondary aim was to assess whether individuals with PMDD or menstrual related mood variability, but no current diagnosis of depression, have an increased family history of depression. Promising evidence of a relationship between family history of MDD and a likelihood of PMDD was discovered. A trend was found for Spectrum PMDD women: a higher rate of Family History of MDD (36%) than non PMDD women (19.6%). Ideally, resting frontal electroencephalographic (EEG) asymmetry could help us learn more about the etiology of depression and hormonal-related depression specifically, and test whether they may share etiological factors.


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