Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorLyon, Cherstin Marieen_US
dc.creatorLyon, Cherstin Marieen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-05T22:08:17Z
dc.date.available2011-12-05T22:08:17Z
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/193911
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation examines the lives and wartime resistance of a group of forty-one Nisei men (Americans of Japanese ancestry) who resisted the draft as a means of protesting their incarceration during World War II. While serving time in the same federal prison for violating Selective Service laws, they became acquainted for the first time and remained life-long friends after the war's end. They supported each other for more than sixty years amidst pressure to hide their identities as resisters, because the majority of Nisei preferred to forget this chapter in American history. This group called themselves the "Tucsonians," and this dissertation begins to tell their story. This study is based on oral histories and archival research and examines citizenship as a contested relationship between individuals and the state.
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectHistoryen_US
dc.titlePrisons and Patriots: The "Tucsonian" Draft Resisters and Citizenship during World War IIen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.contributor.chairAnderson, Karenen_US
dc.identifier.oclc137355905en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDeutsch, Sarahen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMarietta, Jacken_US
dc.identifier.proquest1552en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHistoryen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-24T20:51:50Z
html.description.abstractThis dissertation examines the lives and wartime resistance of a group of forty-one Nisei men (Americans of Japanese ancestry) who resisted the draft as a means of protesting their incarceration during World War II. While serving time in the same federal prison for violating Selective Service laws, they became acquainted for the first time and remained life-long friends after the war's end. They supported each other for more than sixty years amidst pressure to hide their identities as resisters, because the majority of Nisei preferred to forget this chapter in American history. This group called themselves the "Tucsonians," and this dissertation begins to tell their story. This study is based on oral histories and archival research and examines citizenship as a contested relationship between individuals and the state.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
azu_etd_1552_sip1_m.pdf
Size:
996.0Kb
Format:
PDF
Description:
azu_etd_1552_sip1_m.pdf

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record