Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorGood, Thomas L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMitchell, Michele*
dc.creatorMitchell, Micheleen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-05T22:17:36Z
dc.date.available2011-12-05T22:17:36Z
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/194091
dc.description.abstractIn the sport of springboard and platform diving, subjective scoring is used. Based on a ten point scale, judges give immediate scores which reflect the diver's performance. Each diver performs a proscribed number of dives and the total of all dives is tallied to decide final placement. While final placement in a competition is determined by physical skill, a diver's mental state often determines how successful the athlete will in the competition. While there is a plethora of literature that has examined attributions of physical education classes and other sports, there is a dearth of studies addressing the attributional style of elite NCAA male and female divers. Diving requires extreme athleticism, fearlessness and a heightened kinesthetic awareness in becoming both skill-proficient and competitive. This in turn requires intrinsic motivation to meet those challenges as well as being able to make causal attributions from one competition to the next. The purpose of this study is to determine the attributional style of elite NCAA male and female divers as well as to determine if there is a difference in attributional style between male and female divers. Further, this study will determine if the attributive style is related to performance and whether there is a difference between elite NCAA male and female divers. The study will take place at the 2005 NCAA Men's and Women's Diving Championships. At each event and at the completion of his/her final diving event, each athlete will be asked to complete a self-report questionnaire - the Attributional Style Questionnaire. An objective rating of each diver's performance will be paired with his or her attibutional style, as measured by the questionnaire. These data will be analyzed statistically to determine if gender has an effect on the attributional style of elite NCAA male and female divers.
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectEducational Psychologyen_US
dc.titleA Study of the Attributional Style and Performance of Elite NCAA Diversen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.contributor.chairGood, Thomas L.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659747332en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberD'Agostino, Jerome V.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRhoades, Garyen_US
dc.identifier.proquest2117en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.nameDMAen_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-24T21:59:09Z
html.description.abstractIn the sport of springboard and platform diving, subjective scoring is used. Based on a ten point scale, judges give immediate scores which reflect the diver's performance. Each diver performs a proscribed number of dives and the total of all dives is tallied to decide final placement. While final placement in a competition is determined by physical skill, a diver's mental state often determines how successful the athlete will in the competition. While there is a plethora of literature that has examined attributions of physical education classes and other sports, there is a dearth of studies addressing the attributional style of elite NCAA male and female divers. Diving requires extreme athleticism, fearlessness and a heightened kinesthetic awareness in becoming both skill-proficient and competitive. This in turn requires intrinsic motivation to meet those challenges as well as being able to make causal attributions from one competition to the next. The purpose of this study is to determine the attributional style of elite NCAA male and female divers as well as to determine if there is a difference in attributional style between male and female divers. Further, this study will determine if the attributive style is related to performance and whether there is a difference between elite NCAA male and female divers. The study will take place at the 2005 NCAA Men's and Women's Diving Championships. At each event and at the completion of his/her final diving event, each athlete will be asked to complete a self-report questionnaire - the Attributional Style Questionnaire. An objective rating of each diver's performance will be paired with his or her attibutional style, as measured by the questionnaire. These data will be analyzed statistically to determine if gender has an effect on the attributional style of elite NCAA male and female divers.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
azu_etd_2117_sip1_m.pdf
Size:
2.577Mb
Format:
PDF
Description:
azu_etd_2117_sip1_m.pdf

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record