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dc.contributor.advisorKrausman, Paul R.en_US
dc.contributor.advisorBallard, Warren B.en_US
dc.contributor.authorNicholson, Kerry Lynn*
dc.creatorNicholson, Kerry Lynnen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-05T22:22:50Z
dc.date.available2011-12-05T22:22:50Z
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/194192
dc.description.abstractManaging wildlife in urban areas is increasingly necessary for wildlife conservation. Large carnivores like mountain lions (Puma concolor) present a particular challenge to managers because of public safety and the polarizing emotional reactions to human-lion encounters. Intensive development and conversion of large open spaces to small properties and subdivisions has caused increased habitat loss, fragmentation and encroachment. Preserving movement corridors for access to habitat patches is important in maintaining landscape connectivity to ensure viable populations adjacent to urban areas. Because mountain lion habitat is often adjacent to urbanization in Arizona and lions traverse large landscapes, mountain lions are ideal models to examine how human alteration of habitats influences their life history characteristics and ability to adapt to a variety of environments. The objective of this study was to examine the ecology and spatial movements of mountain lions surrounding urban areas. We studied habitat selection, urban use by mountain lions, spatial movements and overlap, genetic relatedness, feline disease, and ectoparasites of mountain lions in southern Arizona.
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectcarnivoreen_US
dc.subjectconservationen_US
dc.subjectPuma concoloren_US
dc.subjecturbanen_US
dc.subjectwildlifeen_US
dc.titleSpatial Movements and Ecology of Mountain Lions in Southern Arizonaen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.contributor.chairKrausman, Paul R.en_US
dc.contributor.chairBallard, Warren B.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659753478en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKoprowski, John L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberShaw, William W.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest10701en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNatural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-24T07:53:45Z
html.description.abstractManaging wildlife in urban areas is increasingly necessary for wildlife conservation. Large carnivores like mountain lions (Puma concolor) present a particular challenge to managers because of public safety and the polarizing emotional reactions to human-lion encounters. Intensive development and conversion of large open spaces to small properties and subdivisions has caused increased habitat loss, fragmentation and encroachment. Preserving movement corridors for access to habitat patches is important in maintaining landscape connectivity to ensure viable populations adjacent to urban areas. Because mountain lion habitat is often adjacent to urbanization in Arizona and lions traverse large landscapes, mountain lions are ideal models to examine how human alteration of habitats influences their life history characteristics and ability to adapt to a variety of environments. The objective of this study was to examine the ecology and spatial movements of mountain lions surrounding urban areas. We studied habitat selection, urban use by mountain lions, spatial movements and overlap, genetic relatedness, feline disease, and ectoparasites of mountain lions in southern Arizona.


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