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dc.contributor.advisorGhosh, Indraneelen_US
dc.contributor.authorPorter, Jason Robert
dc.creatorPorter, Jason Roberten_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-05T22:30:03Z
dc.date.available2011-12-05T22:30:03Z
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/194359
dc.description.abstractThe interactions between protein-protein, protein-nucleic acid, and protein-small molecules are central to biological processes and are key for the design of new therapeutics. Rapid and easy to implement methodologies are needed that enable the interrogation of these interactions in a complex cellular context. Towards this goal, I have utilized the concept of split-protein reassembly, also called protein complementation, for the creation of a variety of sensor architectures that enable the interrogation of protein-nucleic acid, protein-protein, and protein-small molecule interactions. Utilizing the enzymatic split-reporter β-lactamase and existing zinc finger design strategies we applied our recently developed technology termed SEquence-Enabled Reassembly (SEER) towards the creation of a sensor capable of the specific detection of the CryIA transgene. Additionally, the split β-lactamase reporter was utilized for the sitespecific determination of DNA methylation at cytosine residues that is involved in epigenetic regulation. This method, dubbed mCpG-SEER, enabled the direct detection of femtomole levels of dsDNA methylation in sequence specific manner. In a separate endeavor, we have developed and optimized the first cell-free split-reporter systems for GFP, split β-lactamase, and firefly luciferase for the successful dsDNA-dependent reassembly of the various reporters. Our cell free in vitro translation systems eliminates previous bottlenecks encountered in split-reporter technologies such as laborious transfection/cell culture or protein purification. Capitalizing on the ease of use and speed afforded by this new technology we describe the sensitive detection of protein-protein, protein-nucleic acid, and protein-small molecule interactions and inhibitors thereof. In a related area, we have applied this rapid cell-free split-firefly luciferase assay to the specific interrogation of a large class of helix-receptor protein-protein interactions. We have built a panel consisting of the clinically relevant Bcl-2 family of proteins, hDM2, hDM4, and p53 and interrogated the specificity of helix-receptor interactions as well as the specificity of peptide and small-molecule inhibitors of these interactions. Finally, we describe the further applications of our cell-free technology to the development of a large number of general split-firefly luciferase sensors for the detection of ssRNA sequences, the detection of native proteins, the evaluation of protease activity, and interrogation of enzyme-inhibitor interactions. The new methodologies provided in this study provides a general and enabling methodology for the rapid interrogation of a wide variety of biomolecular interactions and their antagonists without the limitations imposed by current in vitro and in vivo approaches.
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectBcl-2en_US
dc.subjectHigh Throughputen_US
dc.subjectIn Vitro Translationen_US
dc.subjectProtein-Nucleic Aciden_US
dc.subjectProtein-Proteinen_US
dc.subjectSplit-Protein Complementationen_US
dc.titleSPLIT-PROTEIN REASSEMBLY METHODS FOR THE DETECTION AND INTERROGATION OF BIOMOLECULAR INTERACTIONS AND MODULATORS THEREOFen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.contributor.chairGhosh, Indraneelen_US
dc.identifier.oclc659753400en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGhosh, Indraneelen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMontfort, William R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberOlenyuk, Bogdan Z.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWysocki, Vicki H.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest10661en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineChemistryen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-07-06T05:24:24Z
html.description.abstractThe interactions between protein-protein, protein-nucleic acid, and protein-small molecules are central to biological processes and are key for the design of new therapeutics. Rapid and easy to implement methodologies are needed that enable the interrogation of these interactions in a complex cellular context. Towards this goal, I have utilized the concept of split-protein reassembly, also called protein complementation, for the creation of a variety of sensor architectures that enable the interrogation of protein-nucleic acid, protein-protein, and protein-small molecule interactions. Utilizing the enzymatic split-reporter β-lactamase and existing zinc finger design strategies we applied our recently developed technology termed SEquence-Enabled Reassembly (SEER) towards the creation of a sensor capable of the specific detection of the CryIA transgene. Additionally, the split β-lactamase reporter was utilized for the sitespecific determination of DNA methylation at cytosine residues that is involved in epigenetic regulation. This method, dubbed mCpG-SEER, enabled the direct detection of femtomole levels of dsDNA methylation in sequence specific manner. In a separate endeavor, we have developed and optimized the first cell-free split-reporter systems for GFP, split β-lactamase, and firefly luciferase for the successful dsDNA-dependent reassembly of the various reporters. Our cell free in vitro translation systems eliminates previous bottlenecks encountered in split-reporter technologies such as laborious transfection/cell culture or protein purification. Capitalizing on the ease of use and speed afforded by this new technology we describe the sensitive detection of protein-protein, protein-nucleic acid, and protein-small molecule interactions and inhibitors thereof. In a related area, we have applied this rapid cell-free split-firefly luciferase assay to the specific interrogation of a large class of helix-receptor protein-protein interactions. We have built a panel consisting of the clinically relevant Bcl-2 family of proteins, hDM2, hDM4, and p53 and interrogated the specificity of helix-receptor interactions as well as the specificity of peptide and small-molecule inhibitors of these interactions. Finally, we describe the further applications of our cell-free technology to the development of a large number of general split-firefly luciferase sensors for the detection of ssRNA sequences, the detection of native proteins, the evaluation of protease activity, and interrogation of enzyme-inhibitor interactions. The new methodologies provided in this study provides a general and enabling methodology for the rapid interrogation of a wide variety of biomolecular interactions and their antagonists without the limitations imposed by current in vitro and in vivo approaches.


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