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dc.contributor.advisorMiller, Thomas Pen_US
dc.contributor.authorSkeffington, Jillian Kathryn
dc.creatorSkeffington, Jillian Kathrynen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-06T13:23:11Z
dc.date.available2011-12-06T13:23:11Z
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/194770
dc.description.abstractThe author engages in a study of rhetoric and composition's disciplinary identity and representations as seen in various disciplinary locations. Despite individual preferences toward other titles, the discipline is commonly referred to as "rhetoric and composition," a title that embraces but does not categorize the field. In this dissertation the author examines the relationship between rhetoric and composition, arguing in the first section of the dissertation that the conjunction "and" is not sufficient to describe the many relationships between these two terms. The first section of the dissertation also examines the positioning of rhetoric and composition in historical texts as well as in journals published by the National Council of Teachers of English, concluding that the hierarchies often created between rhetoric and composition or theory and practice arehighly contextual.The second section of the dissertation examines the role of departmental and institutional structures in the development of doctoral programs in rhetoric and composition, and argues that the discipline needs to take a proactive role in addressing these influences. The author demonstrates this need through an historical examination of the formation of doctoral programs in rhetoric and composition and the disciplinary identity represented by TA training texts. The second section then argues that conscious and considered representations of disciplinary identity are important to the continued growth and development of rhetoric and composition. The dissertation concludes with an argument that rhetoric and composition needs to develop undergraduate majors and minors. The concluding chapter highlights the role of departments and undergraduate majors in the American university and urges scholars and administrators in the discipline to work toward the establishment of undergraduate curricula.
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectcompositionen_US
dc.subjectdisciplineen_US
dc.subjecthistoryen_US
dc.subjectidentityen_US
dc.subjectrhetoricen_US
dc.subjectundergraduate majoren_US
dc.titleLOOKING FOR RHETORIC IN COMPOSITION: A STUDY IN DISCIPLINARY IDENTITYen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.identifier.oclc659750916en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberEnos, Theresa Jen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHall, Anne-Marieen_US
dc.identifier.proquest10294en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglishen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-30T00:57:42Z
html.description.abstractThe author engages in a study of rhetoric and composition's disciplinary identity and representations as seen in various disciplinary locations. Despite individual preferences toward other titles, the discipline is commonly referred to as "rhetoric and composition," a title that embraces but does not categorize the field. In this dissertation the author examines the relationship between rhetoric and composition, arguing in the first section of the dissertation that the conjunction "and" is not sufficient to describe the many relationships between these two terms. The first section of the dissertation also examines the positioning of rhetoric and composition in historical texts as well as in journals published by the National Council of Teachers of English, concluding that the hierarchies often created between rhetoric and composition or theory and practice arehighly contextual.The second section of the dissertation examines the role of departmental and institutional structures in the development of doctoral programs in rhetoric and composition, and argues that the discipline needs to take a proactive role in addressing these influences. The author demonstrates this need through an historical examination of the formation of doctoral programs in rhetoric and composition and the disciplinary identity represented by TA training texts. The second section then argues that conscious and considered representations of disciplinary identity are important to the continued growth and development of rhetoric and composition. The dissertation concludes with an argument that rhetoric and composition needs to develop undergraduate majors and minors. The concluding chapter highlights the role of departments and undergraduate majors in the American university and urges scholars and administrators in the discipline to work toward the establishment of undergraduate curricula.


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