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dc.contributor.advisorAnders, Patricia L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorUnterreiner, Ann M.
dc.creatorUnterreiner, Ann M.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-06T13:34:10Z
dc.date.available2011-12-06T13:34:10Z
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/195008
dc.description.abstractThe intentions expressed by second career individuals about entering the field of education, to make a difference in the lives of young people, mirror many of the philosophical frameworks of teaching for democracy that are found in the literature (Banks, 2005; Nieto, 1999; Dewey, 1916; Parker, 2003). An interest in how the interconnections of teaching to make a difference and teaching for democracy are enacted in second career teacher's classrooms. Four dimensions of teaching for democracy are suggested as a model of socially responsive teaching to study how teaching to make difference is enacted in the beliefs and practices of two second career teachers. The four dimensions include: 1) An ethic of care (Noddings, 1994); 2) Reflexive action (Grant & Zeichner, 1996; Schon, 1987); 3) Learning communities (Brooks & Brooks, 1999; Nieto, 1999; Richardson, 1997); and 4) Managed chaos (Bruner, 1986; Jenlink, 2004).Qualitative case study research was conducted to investigate how two newly certified second career male teachers articulate the beliefs they hold and conduct their practices to teach all children. From the constant comparison analysis common themes of classroom environment, curricular choices, and instructional approaches were identified and anchored the development of the cases. Across cases, the theme of 'life history' emerged as influential in the beliefs and practices to teach to make a difference. An extended analysis was conducted across cases to examine the links of the four dimensions of teaching for democracy present in the stories of each teacher's first year of teaching.Findings of this research study indicates 'life history' impacts the beliefs and practices of second career teachers to teach all students and can be linked to dimensions of teaching for democracy. Students' personal stories are sources for understanding and enhancing an awareness of racial, cultural, and economic diversity in teacher preparation programs (LaBoskey, 2006). This understanding is at the heart of the democratic ideal and a fundamental belief of those "directly responsible for ...creating and sustaining processes of conscious, self-guided evolution...the design of a future society" (Jenlink, 2002, p. 395).
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectteaching for democracyen_US
dc.subjectteacher preparationen_US
dc.subjectsecond career teachersen_US
dc.subjectfour dimensions of teaching for democracyen_US
dc.titleTwo Case Studies of First Year Second Career Male Teachers: The Beliefs They Hold and the Pactices They Conduct to Teach All Studentsen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.contributor.chairAnders, Patricia L.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659746531en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGoodman, Yettaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMoll, Luis C.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1954en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineTeaching & Teacher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-25T05:35:34Z
html.description.abstractThe intentions expressed by second career individuals about entering the field of education, to make a difference in the lives of young people, mirror many of the philosophical frameworks of teaching for democracy that are found in the literature (Banks, 2005; Nieto, 1999; Dewey, 1916; Parker, 2003). An interest in how the interconnections of teaching to make a difference and teaching for democracy are enacted in second career teacher's classrooms. Four dimensions of teaching for democracy are suggested as a model of socially responsive teaching to study how teaching to make difference is enacted in the beliefs and practices of two second career teachers. The four dimensions include: 1) An ethic of care (Noddings, 1994); 2) Reflexive action (Grant & Zeichner, 1996; Schon, 1987); 3) Learning communities (Brooks & Brooks, 1999; Nieto, 1999; Richardson, 1997); and 4) Managed chaos (Bruner, 1986; Jenlink, 2004).Qualitative case study research was conducted to investigate how two newly certified second career male teachers articulate the beliefs they hold and conduct their practices to teach all children. From the constant comparison analysis common themes of classroom environment, curricular choices, and instructional approaches were identified and anchored the development of the cases. Across cases, the theme of 'life history' emerged as influential in the beliefs and practices to teach to make a difference. An extended analysis was conducted across cases to examine the links of the four dimensions of teaching for democracy present in the stories of each teacher's first year of teaching.Findings of this research study indicates 'life history' impacts the beliefs and practices of second career teachers to teach all students and can be linked to dimensions of teaching for democracy. Students' personal stories are sources for understanding and enhancing an awareness of racial, cultural, and economic diversity in teacher preparation programs (LaBoskey, 2006). This understanding is at the heart of the democratic ideal and a fundamental belief of those "directly responsible for ...creating and sustaining processes of conscious, self-guided evolution...the design of a future society" (Jenlink, 2002, p. 395).


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