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dc.contributor.advisorMcPherson, Milleren_US
dc.contributor.advisorBreiger, Ronalden_US
dc.contributor.authorBrashears, Matthew Edward
dc.creatorBrashears, Matthew Edwarden_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-06T13:39:30Z
dc.date.available2011-12-06T13:39:30Z
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/195124
dc.description.abstractHomophily, the tendency for like to associate with like or for birds of a feather to flock together, is one of the most robust findings in all of social science. Despite its ubiquity and obvious importance, however, it is uncertain how much of this regularity derives from the tendency to become friends with those like ourselves (i.e. selection) as opposed to the tendency to become like those with whom we associate (i.e. harmonization). This dissertation grapples with the issue by proposing, first, that both forces play a role and, second, that the impact of one cannot be understood without also considering the effect of the other. After a review of the literature, theory is developed, data introduced, analytical techniques described, and then empirical analysis is undertaken. It is determined that several of the predicted combinations of selection and harmonization are, indeed, present and that these combinations can meaningfully inform our understanding of social life. Directions for future research are then discussed.
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectsocial networksen_US
dc.subjectadolescentsen_US
dc.subjectSienaen_US
dc.subjectobesityen_US
dc.subjectreligionen_US
dc.titlePicking and Choosing, Accepting and Changing: The Effects of Selection and Harmonization on Network Structure and Contenten_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.contributor.chairMcPherson, Milleren_US
dc.contributor.chairBreiger, Ronalden_US
dc.identifier.oclc659749811en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMolm, Lindaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRussell, Stephenen_US
dc.identifier.proquest2778en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSociologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-15T03:47:15Z
html.description.abstractHomophily, the tendency for like to associate with like or for birds of a feather to flock together, is one of the most robust findings in all of social science. Despite its ubiquity and obvious importance, however, it is uncertain how much of this regularity derives from the tendency to become friends with those like ourselves (i.e. selection) as opposed to the tendency to become like those with whom we associate (i.e. harmonization). This dissertation grapples with the issue by proposing, first, that both forces play a role and, second, that the impact of one cannot be understood without also considering the effect of the other. After a review of the literature, theory is developed, data introduced, analytical techniques described, and then empirical analysis is undertaken. It is determined that several of the predicted combinations of selection and harmonization are, indeed, present and that these combinations can meaningfully inform our understanding of social life. Directions for future research are then discussed.


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