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dc.contributor.authorWeiler, Dawn Marie
dc.creatorWeiler, Dawn Marieen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-06T13:39:40Z
dc.date.available2011-12-06T13:39:40Z
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/195127
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to explore the socio-cultural influences and social context associated with living with type 2 diabetes among migrant Latino adults. Extensive research in diabetes care has been conducted; however, there is a significant knowledge gap related to the factors that influcence the achievement of glycemic control and self-management practices of the Latino population in general, and migrant workers specifically. Based on well-documented disparities in complications and health outcomes among Latino adults compared to Anglo-American adults, there is sufficient evidence to question whether traditional Anglo beliefs about self-management are successful or appropriate for the migrant Latino population. Traditional models view self-management as an individual responsibility. Whether this view is congruent with the collectivist cultural tradition held by many Latino adults is unclear. Equally unclear is the degree to which using traditional Anglo-American models of self-management, in teaching about managing type 2 diabetes, influences health outcomes in this population. Culturally congruent care and nursing interventions involves more than an understanding of language and dietary preferences.A qualitative descriptive study using grounded theory techniques was conducted to provide a comprehensive summary of the events in the everyday terms of those events. Data analysis was completed using conventional content analysis strategies.An over-arching meta-theme "Self Management in a Social Environment" emerged. Every aspect of the process of self-management, as described in the four major themes, (1) Family Cohesion, (2) Social Stigma of Disease, (3) Social Expectations/Perceptions of "Illness," and (4) Disease Knowledge and Understanding, was influenced by the social context.This study revealed several socio-cultural influences that impact diabetes self-management practices for the migrant Latino adult. The familist traditions, central to the Mexican culture had both positive and negative consequences on diabetes management. Social stigma, in relation to a diabetes diagnosis, is likely not exclusive to this population. However, the associated negative social expectations and perceptions might well be unique. The discovery surrounding the lack of, and approach to, diabetes management education provided to individuals, families, and community members may well be central to improving the health of this population.
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectDiabetesen_US
dc.subjectMexicanen_US
dc.subjectSelf-Managementen_US
dc.subjectMigranten_US
dc.subjectFamilismen_US
dc.titleThe Socio-Cultural Influences and Process of Living with Diabetes for the Migrant Latino Adulten_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.contributor.chairCrist, Janice D.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659748379en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCrist, Janice D.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBadger, Terry A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberReel, Sally J.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest2462en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-26T03:46:48Z
html.description.abstractThe purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to explore the socio-cultural influences and social context associated with living with type 2 diabetes among migrant Latino adults. Extensive research in diabetes care has been conducted; however, there is a significant knowledge gap related to the factors that influcence the achievement of glycemic control and self-management practices of the Latino population in general, and migrant workers specifically. Based on well-documented disparities in complications and health outcomes among Latino adults compared to Anglo-American adults, there is sufficient evidence to question whether traditional Anglo beliefs about self-management are successful or appropriate for the migrant Latino population. Traditional models view self-management as an individual responsibility. Whether this view is congruent with the collectivist cultural tradition held by many Latino adults is unclear. Equally unclear is the degree to which using traditional Anglo-American models of self-management, in teaching about managing type 2 diabetes, influences health outcomes in this population. Culturally congruent care and nursing interventions involves more than an understanding of language and dietary preferences.A qualitative descriptive study using grounded theory techniques was conducted to provide a comprehensive summary of the events in the everyday terms of those events. Data analysis was completed using conventional content analysis strategies.An over-arching meta-theme "Self Management in a Social Environment" emerged. Every aspect of the process of self-management, as described in the four major themes, (1) Family Cohesion, (2) Social Stigma of Disease, (3) Social Expectations/Perceptions of "Illness," and (4) Disease Knowledge and Understanding, was influenced by the social context.This study revealed several socio-cultural influences that impact diabetes self-management practices for the migrant Latino adult. The familist traditions, central to the Mexican culture had both positive and negative consequences on diabetes management. Social stigma, in relation to a diabetes diagnosis, is likely not exclusive to this population. However, the associated negative social expectations and perceptions might well be unique. The discovery surrounding the lack of, and approach to, diabetes management education provided to individuals, families, and community members may well be central to improving the health of this population.


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