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dc.contributor.advisorBosworth, Krisen_US
dc.contributor.authorWright, Barbara Ann
dc.creatorWright, Barbara Annen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-06T13:42:25Z
dc.date.available2011-12-06T13:42:25Z
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/195194
dc.description.abstractTo be successful, future leaders of the school, district, or other levels will require very different characteristics than those expected of leaders in the last decade (Fullan, 2000). The purpose of this study was to identify the key characteristics needed by school district superintendents to meet the demands of this position in the twenty-first century. The key characteristics were identified by exemplary superintendents who had been recognized for their effectiveness. The ten most frequently identified characteristics were then analyzed for commonalities and anomalies. A selected group of survey respondents also participated in semi-structured interviews to develop an understanding of the context surrounding the characteristic selections.This study of the key characteristics of effective superintendent indicates that an effective Arizona school superintendent for the 21st century must be centered on having the capacity, knowledge and aspirations to develop a collaborative relationship-driven culture. This study suggested both quantitatively and qualitatively that the development of positive relationships with all educational stakeholders was imperative to the success of the superintendent. Practicing and future superintendents will need to have superior interpersonal skills to be successful in the 21st century. Practicing and future superintendents will need to have superior interpersonal skills and it is the responsibility of university programs and professional organizations to provide opportunities for the development of these skills.
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectCharacteristicsen_US
dc.subjectEducational Leadershipen_US
dc.subjectMixed Methodsen_US
dc.subjectSuperintendenten_US
dc.titleCommon Characteristics of the Superintendency as Identified by Exemplary Arizona Superintendentsen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.contributor.chairBosworth, Krisen_US
dc.identifier.oclc659751999en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHendricks, J. Roberten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPedicone, Johnen_US
dc.identifier.proquest10382en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Leadershipen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.nameEd.D.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-04-26T14:40:01Z
html.description.abstractTo be successful, future leaders of the school, district, or other levels will require very different characteristics than those expected of leaders in the last decade (Fullan, 2000). The purpose of this study was to identify the key characteristics needed by school district superintendents to meet the demands of this position in the twenty-first century. The key characteristics were identified by exemplary superintendents who had been recognized for their effectiveness. The ten most frequently identified characteristics were then analyzed for commonalities and anomalies. A selected group of survey respondents also participated in semi-structured interviews to develop an understanding of the context surrounding the characteristic selections.This study of the key characteristics of effective superintendent indicates that an effective Arizona school superintendent for the 21st century must be centered on having the capacity, knowledge and aspirations to develop a collaborative relationship-driven culture. This study suggested both quantitatively and qualitatively that the development of positive relationships with all educational stakeholders was imperative to the success of the superintendent. Practicing and future superintendents will need to have superior interpersonal skills to be successful in the 21st century. Practicing and future superintendents will need to have superior interpersonal skills and it is the responsibility of university programs and professional organizations to provide opportunities for the development of these skills.


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